Have you used sulphur?

I hae been told that it helps to remove harmful organisms from the soil. I am dubious. Have you had real-word experience with it?
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Yes, I have...
I was having a die-off of English Ivy on my fence line. I took some of the dying plant to the local nursery (Gardenville). They said it looked like root rot which is fungal. Made sense, we'd had an unusual amount of rain at the time.
They sold me sulphur and told me to water it well into the soil where the plants were.
Wait two weeks then add a soil probiotic that they also sold me.
It worked.
I'd personally not use it unless you have a reason to do so. A specific infection. Add probiotic soil bacteria instead.
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The sulfur may have been to lower the pH, which frees up nutrients, or may improve the environment for the probiotic, or weaken the target organism.
If you have any more random statements, I'd be happy to generalize on them ;O)
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<grins> Sulphur kills fungus by lowering the Ph.Garlic is high in sulphur too which is why it's _very_ effective in killing yeast...
I'd not heard of using it tho' to change the soil Ph. Makes sense. Wonder if it'd be good for pine trees? Our soil here is very Alkaline which is why many of them don't do well.
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I'd love to get back to your yeast but . . .
My confusion here is that forests, undisturbed soil, have a lot of mycelium growth, and they are acidic.
Gardens tend to be at higher pH. ?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_pH Altering Soil pH
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Not. <g>
I advised a good female friend about it. She was having problems with over the counter crap that no longer works. I was advised by one of our ER docs (now head of our ER) that OTC remedies were deregulated just because they seldom work anymore. The yeast had become immune to many of them. It makes money for the drug companies.
The ones that still do work are still prescription only, and have side effects. Plus, some women mis-diagnose themselves. Wet preps and a microscope are the only way to diagnose it. There are advantages to working in the lab in health care. <g>
I'd landed in to a bunch of fresh garlic heads at the asian market, 6 heads for $.99. I gave her 12 heads and told her to pig out on it. She liked garlic so did so. She liked garlic.
It worked. ;-)

I understand. Some pine trees only live well with symbiotic fungus. Amanita muscaria only grows in conjunction with certain trees too.
Remember, there is a distinction between disease causing fungus vs. friendly fungus?

Cool link thanks!
All I know is that the advice from gardenville saved my English Ivy.
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Our soils here in TN are high in PH because we're on limestone.

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It's used here in TN to lower soil PH. To plant hollies I mixed it with sand, Ironite, topsoil and composted manure. That was mixed well with the poor clay soil here. They're beautiful with no chlorosis. :-)
Makes sense.

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To lower the pH of the soil where I have my blueberries and potatoes. I've never heard of sulfur being used as a soil treatment but wetable sulfur is used on the aerial parts of plants.
You may want to look at http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/CONTROLS/sulfur.html before using sulfur.
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wrote:

We pour a narrow trail of it around certain outbuildings. Keeps the snakes out.
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I've used it to lower the soil PH. It's also supposed to make iron more available to the plants. Our soil is alkaline and low in Iron.
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www.locoworks.com ha scritto:

There is something right in it. I have read all the answers and I think the most clear in explaining this issues are those of Billy. Sulphur lowers the soil pH and then make the fungus more competive than bacterias whose better pH is around 7 (neutrality). This fact make the fungus more present in acidic soils like those of pinewoods, whose organic matter decompose more slowly. But as Billy said before a lower pH frees up nutrients (really frees up some micro-nutrients and some of the soil phosphorous). But if micronutrients are too much available they can be toxic for humans and plants too (for the humans particularly: lead, aluminium and others, that are more frequent in polluted soils). Instead of sulphur I suggest you to use green manure with some species of brassicaceae plant family like Sinapis alba and Rhaphanus sativus. These species and also garlic are useful against soil organisms and they contain and adsorb from the soil the same sulphur you were advised to use. You can find more about this issue in the following sites I've just found through a Google search (I think these links could be useful according to your question, but as someone say ...there are also some disadvantages in using them):
http://www2.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/pr/garten/schau/SinapisalblL/White_must.html http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Sinapis+alba http://wsare.usu.edu/pro/fieldrep_00/pdf/refinal/sw95021.pdf I hope this could help, Bye
Luca Fianchini - Italy
You can find me also here: http://www.agrolinker.co.uk/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.pl (discussion forum about agriculture in USA, Europe, etc) http://www.agrolinker.co.uk/ (articles and news about agriculture and landscaping)
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