Harvesting Garlic

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Well, all I can say is that the harvesting rules probably alter according to climate. And planting time. I have harvested garlic in mid winter -waaay after the tops died down, they're mushy then if it's been wet although a few do survive to regrow next year. I've dug them up in summer too, but they weren't ready. I don't understand your 5 leaves left bit. Mine never get more than five anyway. When they *start* to go yellow, they have obviously stopped growing. I do reccommend a dry day though, easier to dry them off.
NZ climate is temperate. So quite how Osaka's would be different I can't say. But a google search found plenty of advice :-)
It is obviously a matter of research. How is your Portuguse? The abstract is English but the article isn't. http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S0102-05362003000300019&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
More temperate info. www.tropical-seeds.com/tech_forum/veg_herbs/garlic1.html+harvesting+garlic+tropical&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
Try a search on garlic tropical and harvesting. See what you find.
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Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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il 06 May 2004 10:54:33 +1200, "Loki" ha scritto:

I've found several sources that talk about tops yellowing. This is one. http://w3.aces.uiuc.edu/NRES/extension/factsheets/vc-11/VC-11.html The other is my book for NZ conditions, and some other sites.
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Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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On 5/5/04 6:13 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@news.teranews.com, "Ross Reid"

Yes, I agree with Ross's five green leaves remaining.... As far as planting time...plant so the plant starts to grow before the cold sets in when nothing will grow. (60 days before) Garlic hibernates over the winter and will start to grow again when it gets warm enough. It is important to plant fairly deep so that frozen soil does not push (heave) the garlic to the surface during the winter. Covering with mulch, as someone has mentioned, keeps the ground consistently frozen.... Gary Fort Langley BC Canada
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il Tue, 11 May 2004 17:56:08 GMT, gary davis ha scritto:

Frozen soil? Brrr, we only get to -6C air maybe once a year at night, if that. Obviously it all depends on climate for cultivation 'rules'.
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On Wed, 12 May 2004 09:03:30 +1200, Loki wrote:

And also for varieties. Google for "soft neck" / "hard neck". If you live where the climate seldom gets good and cold, I think you'll need to plant soft neck varieties and you'll need to plant them on a different schedule than a northern gardener.
Bill
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il Tue, 18 May 2004 01:07:00 -0400, Anonymous ha scritto:

This started with a question from a person in Osaka, which was pretty hot when I was there. Not to mention of dubious air quality.
As for soft neck and hard neck, I'd never heard these terms used before. I just planted garlic from what I had or bought some from the nursery. They just called them 'garlic'. They've never flowered though.
I'll have to till my garden if I want to plant anything, it's as hard as a rock at the moment. Unfortunately I can't hover over the soil to weed it.
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Loki said:

Soft neck, then. Hard neck generally has fewer cloves wrapped around a hard stem, and the hard stem is the remnant of the flowering stalk.
Hardnecked garlic has a zippier flavor; softneck generally stores longer and has smaller (and better wrapped) cloves.
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Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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il Tue, 18 May 2004 06:05:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@someplace.net.net (Pat Kiewicz) ha scritto:

I've just read that elephant garlic is actually a type of leek.
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