Hardy !

We've had temps as low as 8? F here ... I was out by the garden today bringing in some firewood , and noticed the bok choi , spinach , and lettuce all still have green leaves - as do the strawberries . Everything else is deader'n hail , but those four really surprised me . I've been involved in a discussion on chisel plow/cultivators in another group - if I build something there will be more space under cultivation next year ... buying this little yard/garden tractor is altering my life - for the better if you ask my back ! That wood I brought in today was dragged on a "sled" by the tractor instead of hauled in the wheelbarrow or on the furniture dolly .
--
Snag



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Terry Coombs wrote:

the strawberries here survive fine without much bother in most places. i lightly mulch some of them that are more exposed to the wind and cold but i don't think it makes that much difference in the end because the surrounding plants will gladly take over any space vacated by a few of the weaker brethren.
i don't know what the lowest temps have been yet, but we are getting some snow. luckily not as much as the folks along the shorelines of the lakes. those folks in NY state are getting a bunch.

:)
songbird
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On 11/19/2014 8:30 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

See, you're already in the "homesteader" mode Terry. When I was in my twenties I used to farm nearly ten acres plus a full time job and run a side business to boot.
Had cow and calf, pigs, chickens, rabbits, goats, etc. Now I live on a 6500 square foot lot with a large house on it and have three raised bed gardens totaling 32 running foot and a lot of "stuff" planted along the board fence. Much easier to care for, less stress on a 75-year old body, and gives me more time to nap with the dawg and play with the great grandkids.
It got down to about 32F the other night and then warmed up again. There is a microclimate here in Houston, TX area, mostly caused by nearly six million people living here. Sometimes I wish I was still on my old ten acre place in the countryside, just for the peace and quiet.
George
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George Shirley wrote:

I TOLD my wife I was born a hundred fifty years too late ... or early . We're not getting into hooved livestock - yet - but might one day . The peace and quiet is one thing we like here , when we hear a gunshot we figger Bubba shot a deer , not that Demetriolarius shot his girl friend Lakatricia ...
--
Snag



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On 11/20/2014 7:59 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

That's one of the joys of living outside a city or town. I had my gun shop on a side road along one side of the ten acres. Used to sight in weapons on an old dead tree exactly one hundred yards from the shop. Had a rest built into a window. Worked for years until someone decided to buy the woods downrange and open a nursery. Had to drive five miles to the club range then. Was nothing to hear gun shots both day and night out in the wilderness. At night we figured it was raccoon hunters, daytime it was squirrels or deer. Days of glory back then, working two jobs and then farming and ranching. Thank goodness for a couple of good kids and a lovely wife, none of whom thought work was below them. Still good kids in their early fifties and hard workers and still a lovely, hard working wife.
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