Ground Beef Recall Expanded

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Perhaps of interest, given the recent discussions about the beef industry and the fact that some of ya may be getting one of these toxic gut bombs from somewhere. Just happened to be on the MSM news too.
Nearly 22 MILLION lbs of possibly E.coli contaminated dead cow. WOW!
Homegrown/locally grown is looking better all the time, eh? So are beans and rice! With the sometimes crawdad thrown in.
I love this line.......
"We sincerely regret any inconvenience and concerns this may cause our consumers," Livermore said. (Like your death)
Charlie......who apologizes if this shows more than once.....had a glitch-thingie in the posting-thingie........or something. It kept refusing to show. Hmmmm......black helicopters and all......I kept cutting things from the post commentaries.
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http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/MEAT_RECALL?SITE=NMALJ&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE ÞFAULT
Ground Beef Recall Expanded Across U.S.
By TOM HESTER Jr. Associated Press Writer
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- The Topps Meat Co. on Saturday expanded its recall of frozen hamburger patties to include 21.7 million pounds of ground beef that may be contaminated with E. coli bacteria that sickened more than a dozen people in eight states.
The recall of products distributed to retail grocery stores and food service institutions in the United States was a drastic increase from the 332,000 pounds recalled Tuesday.
The recall represents all Topps products with either a "sell by date" or a "best if used by date" between Sept. 25 this year and Sept. 25, 2008. The Elizabeth-based company said this information is found on a package's back panel.
All recalled products also have a USDA establishment number of EST 9748, which is located on the back panel of the package and-or in the USDA legend, the company said.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Friday it had suspended the grinding of raw products at the Topps plant after inspectors found inadequate safety measures at the Topps plant. The USDA declined to detail the inadequate safety measures.
"Because the health and safety of our consumers is our top priority, we are taking these expansive measures," said Geoffrey Livermore, Topps' operations vice president.
He said Topps has augmented its procedures with microbiologists and food safety experts.
"We sincerely regret any inconvenience and concerns this may cause our consumers," Livermore said.
The USDA said three people are confirmed as getting E. Coli from Topps products, with 22 other cases under investigation. Cases were found in Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Maine, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
E. coli causes intestinal illness that generally clears up within a week for adults but can be deadly for the very young, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems. Symptoms can include severe stomach cramps, bloody diarrhea and, in extreme cases, kidney failure.
A full list of the recalled products is available at http://www.toppsmeat.com/ .
2007 The Associated Press.
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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 23:58:43 -0500, Charlie wrote:

You want to raise your own cattle? I hope you have a big back yard.
Meat is going to have bacteria on it. Cattle have e-coli in their guts, just like you do, so when you slaughter them that bacteria is going to end up on the meat. In the case of hamburger it's going to get mixed in when you grind it. The only way to eliminate it is to cook it or irradiate it. This isn't new news, it's the reason that we've been cooking our food for the last million years or so.
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On 1 Oct 2007 12:35:17 GMT, General Schvantzkoph

Did you ever drive by a slaughter pen? The ground is soaked with urine and feces and the cattle lay in that, stand in it and wait to have their throats slashed and bled to death. The meat industry is dusgusting and vile. So, I did the best possible thing; I don't eat any meat at all. No fish, fish is meat. We don't need meat of any kind.
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How are your vitamin B-12 levels?
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Peace, Om

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wrote:

Perfect, actually. B-12 is found in other ways being a vegan or vegetarian. We need 20-30 grams of protein each day. I get more than that.
V
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Just wondering... as I did research that. Vitamin B-12 is not found in vegetables.
I think you can use Brewers yeast supplements to get it?
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wrote:

I take Solgar vitamins and minerals. Most enriched foods have B-12 in them.
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I use Solgar and "Now" brand a lot.
I'm wondering tho' where the B-12 is coming from?
If it is animal in source...
I'm not trying to be argumentative, I really am curious how you solve the dilemma. Meat is getting to be too expensive, but for the first time in my life I am NOT anemic! My Dr.s tell me it's due to my change in diet in eating low carb and including meat in every meal.
My grocery bills are cheaper if I eat more fresh produce. I just have to make sure that said produce is low in starch and sugar. (Not difficult if one knows about the nutritional content of various types of veggies).
Pasta and grain are out. Period. So is most fruit.
See the problem?
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wrote:

I think your research was limited because in ten seconds I found this:
http://www.vegsoc.org/info/vitmineral.html#cop
Either way, I am lacto/ovo for now and slowly moving toward vegan. This takes time, and needs dilligence. On the other hand while red meat may provide certain things, it also provides artery clogging cholesterol, which mine is 130 total. Good is twice as high as bad.
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Jangchub wrote:

None of those foods listed for B12 on that site are natural foods, so, B12 is not naturally contained in any vegetable sources. Yeast, yes. Other fungi, not sure.
Vitamins are fine. I tried some B12 tabs one time, but they kept giving me the runs.
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Because you got the runs doesn't mean everyone gets the runs. I take a very high quality multi vitamin.
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Jangchub wrote:

Did I say that?
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That is why I mentioned Brewers Yeast.
As far as I've been able to find, it is the ONLY unfortified plant source of that very vital vitamin.
As for B12 supplements giving you the runs? There are sometimes other things in supplements. ;-) Might want to try another brand before discounting it.
Solgar VM-75 is high in B-complex and is an excellent supplement brand to consider.
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Omelet wrote:

Ok, splitting hairs here, but calling yeast a plant is off-base. They're a fungus I believe, not a plant. They can be called a non-animal source.

I eat meat. Though Szechuan can give me the runs.

I'll just take my Lipitor.
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Fine. Be Mr. Biologist. <g> There are 5 kingdoms (last I learned in College anyhoo) and Fungi is indeed it's own critter.

Sounds like you have IBS. You may want to consider keeping a food log for awhile and pinpointing stuff.

Hope you take some liver support supplements!
I can control Cholesterol level with diet.
Avoiding sugar and starch for the most part seems to do the most good.
Fat? <laughs> Research proved that high fat diets have zilch effect on Cholesterol levels ages ago when using isolation diets.
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yup!!!!!

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actually, eating a low carb, high protein/fat diet will lower BP and cholesterol. One day DH came home from the physicians with Lipitor. I threw the Lipitor into the garbage and went thru the house throwing all the processed grains and other carbs out. He started eating the low carb diet, high protein diet and the next checkup DH's cholesterol was great. It is a fight for me to keep the crap out of the house. DH does the shopping and sneaks stuff in. I find it, I throw it. I find candy wrappers etc in the car.
50% of people with heart disease dont have high cholesterol. Cholesterol is a "patch" for wounds in artery tissue. Notice that veins dont become "clogged" like arteries do. Clogged arteries are a sign of an infectious disease by chlamydia and probably other bacteria (they have found shared epitopes).
The anti-cholesterol hysteria is entirely due to pharmaceutical houses profits. until recently they even had a disclaimer at the bottom of their ads "Lipitor has not been found to lower the frequency of heart disease".
Ingrid

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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/09/science/09tier.html Diet and Fat: A Severe Case of Mistaken Consensus
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On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 09:29:26 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

My point in making the distinction between empty calories and not empty calories had more to do with the absolute nutritional health of the body than it did to show that fats were not good for us.
I think there have also been studies done where genetically tested individuals with no obesity at all have high cholesterol/triglicerides as part of their basic make-up.
If we eat nothing but sugar and fat and stay under the allotted calorie count which determines how rapidly we lose, gain or maintain weight, we will have malnutrition. That's why I said good/bad calories.
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

A book to start conversations in any event, however in this world where the FDA or USDA are not allowed to make food recommendations because of various marketing-groups financial pressure on members of congress, it may be too soon to say that the world of nutrition is turned up-side down. I'm not saying that Mr. Taubes is a fellow traveler but let us all remember that Exxon-Mobil was paying up to $10,000 for favorable articles to be published. So as we contemplate Mr. Taubes book, let's take it with a grain of salt, before we declare the new millennium.
Apparently Mr. Taubes makes an argument that all calories are not equal (they are) i.e. fat calories can be counted differently than carb calories. Please keep in mind that each gram of carb or protein contain 4 kcals of energy, whereas each gram of fat (liquid or solid) contains 9 kcals of energy. A calorie is a calorie regardless of its' provenance.
While dietary cholesterol may not be a problem, it is still my understanding that saturated fats that are solid at room temperature, elicit a serum cholesterol response. As the beneficiary of by-pass surgery, I'll take a wait and see attitude about saturated fats.
Mr. Taubes is reported to show that not all meat eating cultures suffer from coronary heart disease as western culture does. This is addressed in Michael Pollans book "Dilemma" as the difference between grass raised and grain raised animals, no matter be they beef or salmon. The grass raised beef and wild salmon having higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids that the feed lot beef or the farmed salmon. He poses the question of which makes a better purchase, the cheap food or the food with omega-3, beta-carotenes, and vitamin E; quantity or quality? In the wild, humanity as hunter-gathers had an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 1 to 1 in their nutrition. In post civilized culture today, the ratio is 10 to 1, which directly leads to more cardiovascular disease.
Before breaking out the bacon rinds, you may want to consider that more veggies, a little less protein, and a big dollop of exercise will help keep you stay on the right side of the grass.
dr-solo, I'll look forward to your review of Mr. Taubes book.
--
FB - FFF

Billy

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