?? Grasshopper Control

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Derald wrote:

hmm, we clean them out daily/every other day and scrub them once a week or two. not enough time for a mosquito to breed in that kind of setup.

if it moves it spreads something. just might not be anything we catch.

cats alone will keep the birds away. and if the bird baths are too close to cover of any kind they don't like that much. too easy to get ambushed...

oops. :)

not unless you can toss them in the air at dusk.

i've never seen a bird eat a green bean here. the closest we have to tame is the killdeer that i will go out and work around. they flutter and sqwawk for a bit, but then they settle back down and nest again. can be 2ft away. they like the gravel and perennial beds and how open it is here.

that is open enough to be bluebird hunting ground and not too far from your place for a steady water supply to be found by them.

stills sounds like you do ok with what you got going there.
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Derald wrote:

hm, those don't seem to be around here. they don't look familiar to me. as it seems by the description that they can do some damage too.

:)

good eatin'?
how is your garlic turning out?
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Derald wrote:

interplanted how? are they crowded and shaded at all? this is the time when you want to make sure they are getting as much sun as possible. thin leaves of surrounding plants if needed.

good luck! can't imagine garlic from Wisconsin being majorly harmed by that little bit of cold.

gotta get out the rain dance gear and shake it up a bit. :)

what variety are you looking at adding?
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Derald wrote:

? what's that?
most interesting critter i found in the ground was a bright green large grub that hissed. talk about startled!

choker loop trap works for us here when they wander in from the farm field next to us. since they feed often i can get them the same day i set the trap, once i know the run they are using.
i used to trap moles as a kid for $ as part of the mowing and lawncare stuff i did.
very supersoft fur.

seems like they could even be harvested with some kind of rake, stick, and pan arrangement. good food for a fish farm too.
i had a fried one once in college. tasted like a roach (long past those days now ha).
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

http://www.epa.gov/oppbppd1/biopesticides/ingredients/factsheets/factsheet_117001.htm
http://www.cabi.org/FC/Default.aspx?site 3&page@73&LoadModule=GlossaryModule&GlossaryID41&WebSiteCode1=QF
No, but as it happens I found it and looked into it when I was looking into predatory nematodes. -- One research project leads to another.
The general rule is that it is slow acting and not effective for home gardening due to the distances grasshoppers and locust can travel.
That ruled it out with prejudice for me because we just have an urban quarter acre.
It affects lepidoptera... It would seem commonsesical that using it in grasshopper bait would render the concern about killing off butterflies and moths a non-issue. ...with the caveat that what appears to be common sense isn't always the case.
I never did find anything in the literature that indicated an effect on other organisms. The literature may have changed since.
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I live in the Land of the damnyankee Snow. So tonight while it's freezing here, it'll be in the mid to high 60's where you live. But come spring and a new batch of insects are born, none of their ancestors will be around to greet them.
I figure it's a trade off damnyankees and insects. To minimize dealing with insects, you move north. To minimize, dealing with damnyankees, you move south.
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Derald wrote:

in time y'all's decendents are going to be boat people or northerners again.
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Derald wrote:

ok, i'll mark it so people can ignore it. i like the color or illustration it provides. :)

*grin* good for a bit of fun.
ima mutt. half italian, quarter (english/3parts, scottish/1part) and last quarter unknown, rumored to be mix of native and german, but not too likely to ever be known.

:) thanks for the laugh, never heard that term before.
i lived in the hills of TN for a few years and then came back north when it was clear i was spending way too much time on the road driving to visit. no regrets other than i really miss Asheville, hiking in the hills and swimming in the resevoir.
my dad, step-ma, step-sister are much further south than you are there on the gulf side (down in everglade city). they'll be boat people too eventually or have to migrate north as the water levels rise. or perhaps they'll all get 'et by anacondas. i wonder how long it will be before we start eating those buggers as they are growing so fast...
and no, i'm not volunteering to go harvest them puppies either. i like snakes, but i also know when i've met my match.
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wrote:

Yep, we have an over population of "half backs" here in WNC. Steve "If it's tourist season, why can't we shoot them?"
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