Got Cicada ?

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Fried Soft-Shelled Cicadas
60 Freshly emerged 17 year Cicadas 3 cup Flour Salt and pepper to season Flour 4 Eggs, beaten  1 cup Corn oil or slightly salted Butter
The recipe yield is 4 Servings
The best way to prepare them is to dip them, still alive, in beaten egg,
roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently sauté them until they are golden brown.
The seventeen year cicada is considered a delicacy by nearly every living creature and when emerging, by the millions, stuff every animal for miles. Birds have trouble getting off the ground. Foxes waddle. Garter snakes are lumpy. Dogs and cats curl up and sleep all day. In former times, the Native Americans found them to be a worthy addition to their diets when available. The cicadas emerge at night and hang like snow white Christmas ornaments from the trees. As they dry, their color darkens to a black with orange decorative stripes. They are at their finest at night when they just emerge and are still soft. They make great campfire cooking fare. For those who are interested, they are kosher!
They have a wonderful rich nutty flavor. Preparing them is simplicity itself. To find a supply of cicadas, call or write a local college or university department of entomology. They can supply information as to which brood will be emerging in your area or near your area. They may be
able to supply a general map and even specific dates when the emergence will occur. Here, in Indiana, we will have to wait until about Memorial Day weekend, 2002 A.D. So you see, this is not a treat that you can just
go out and pick up at Krogers. It is worth the wait, even if it is just to say that you have done it! John Hartman Indianapolis, IN 1996    
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<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <b>Fried Soft-Shelled Cicadas</b> <p>60 Freshly emerged 17 year Cicadas <br>3 cup Flour <br>Salt and pepper to season Flour <br>4 Eggs, beaten <br>&nbsp;1 cup Corn oil or slightly salted Butter <p>The recipe yield is 4 Servings <p>The best way to prepare them is to dip them, still alive, in beatenegg, <br>roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently sauté them until theyare <br>golden brown. <p>The seventeen year cicada is considered a delicacy by nearly every living <br>creature and when emerging, by the millions, stuff every animal formiles. <br>Birds have trouble getting off the ground. Foxes waddle. Garter snakesare <br>lumpy. Dogs and cats curl up and sleep all day. In former times, the <br>Native Americans found them to be a worthy addition to their dietswhen <br>available. The cicadas emerge at night and hang like snow white Christmas <br>ornaments from the trees. As they dry, their color darkens to a blackwith <br>orange decorative stripes. They are at their finest at night when they <br>just emerge and are still soft. They make great campfire cooking fare.For <br>those who are interested, they are kosher! <p>They have a wonderful rich nutty flavor. Preparing them is simplicity <br>itself. To find a supply of cicadas, call or write a local collegeor <br>university department of entomology. They can supply information asto <br>which brood will be emerging in your area or near your area. They maybe <br>able to supply a general map and even specific dates when the emergence <br>will occur. Here, in Indiana, we will have to wait until about Memorial <br>Day weekend, 2002 A.D. So you see, this is not a treat that you canjust <br>go out and pick up at Krogers. It is worth the wait, even if it isjust to <br>say that you have done it! John Hartman Indianapolis, IN 1996<br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp;</html>
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