Goals for next year?

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from durham, NC (we've been in our new house for a year and we're on a strict budget):
1. continue to purchase bulbs and plants in bulk from places like terra ceia 2. expand the small planting beds started this spring 3. start oodles of plants from seed 4. tackle the backyard, which is now a mess; create a bird-friendly paradise and raised-bed planters for fruits/vegetables 5. learn how to pot up container gardens that look as lush as those in magazines and on TV
pat :)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Patskywriter) wrote:

Understand that those are pretty bogus, and bear the same relationship to real life as an anorexic "super model" does to a real woman.
#endrant
And mine, after some ill-considered thought, and a lot of walking in the sun:
I will stop feeling sorry for myself; the sudden changes of two years ago aren't personal, and I'm doing pretty well anyway.
I will spend more time in the garden that's really too big for me to manage well (Tom Jefferson did the same; I'm in good company), not because the weeds are an embarassment, but because I feel better when I'm outdoors pulling weeds and getting dirty than almost any other time.
I will spend the winter testing stored seeds, researching that solar greenhouse project, and doing the redecorating that's thirty years overdue.
I'll get the peppers and tomatoes planted on time this spring. Promise!
Actually, spring has already started; I'm preparing the garlic bed for planting within the next couple of weeks. It's amazing how much better things look with a couple of passes of the rototiller and a good dose of compost!
Life is good.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at www.albany.net/~gwoods Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1200' elevation. NY WO G
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 12:48:13 -0400, Gary Woods

It's too bad you don't live closer to us: you can pull LOTS of weeds here. :)

Sounds like fun (except the redecorating part).

I forgot to buy garlic. :(
I'm planning my next year's 'selling garden' which will mainly be miniature vegetable plants.
And I do mean miniature PLANTS, not miniature fruit - tomatoes such as Red Robin, where the plants get about one foot high, Spicy Globe Bush Basil (small), mini-pepper plants and mini-eggplant plants.
I'm growing various types of these this winter in our big bay window to test them.
I hope to sell them - already potted in 6.5" azalea pots, and hardened off - at our local farmers' market, and possibly the farmers' market in Nearest Small City in New York State (which is much larger than the local one).
We don't know if they will sell, but we hope so. Everyone who comes to our house and sees them wants them - this is a good sign. They really do fruit and they're cute little things! ;)
I'm hoping to produce and sell about 240 plants. Hoping. Producing them is OK, that I *know* I can do. Selling is the only iffy part.
Pat
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pat, i've always built raised beds for my veggies/fruits. i'd never consider NOT using raised beds! :)
can't wait to start getting my backyard together—we can grow a lot more stuff here in durham NC than we could in chicago!
pat
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On 13 Oct 2003 15:12:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Patskywriter) wrote:

Judging from my experience, you won't be sorry that you did the work to get raised beds! I'd never, never go back...never. NEVER. (Can you tell I really love raised-bed gardening?)

You know, I always wonder how long they'll survive?
I've not had good luck with mixed plantings in small to medium-sized containers. I think some plants like more water, some like less, etc. Some grow aggressively and crowd others out. The mixed containers you see on TV only need to look good for one day...
Pat
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Patskywriter said:

One big secret to keeping them looking good: Use Osmocote as the fertilizer
Some other things: Get a good potting mix. The best, most consistantly high quality mix I get I mail order from Gardener's Supply Company.
Limit the flower color palette to closely match colors or to two related colors (ex: deep yellow and scarlet orange), with different foliage or, go with two contrasting colors (blue-violet and orange).
Try to have a trailing plant, a low plants, mid-height plants, and a tall plant. I like 'spikes' (Dracena) or grasses as the tall plant.
It's best if they look just a *little* skimpy at the start.
Water them faithfully.
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thanks, pat, for all the suggestions!!! i'm guessing when you say osmocote, you're talking about the slow-release fertilizer? i actually use that now, when i pot up pansies and whatnot. your suggestions were great, and i'll follow them faithfully this coming spring. :)
pat
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Patskywriter said:

Yes, Osmocote is the slow-release fertilizer. Very good for potted plants.
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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Doncha just love these kinds of beans fresh of the plants? I just love planting shell beans and wish we had more room for them.
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