Garden Fences

Ok, I have rabbits, groundhogs, and deer. Please describe the fence I need around my garden.
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Serious question?
Solid, at least 6 foot high to deter the deer who don't like to jump over when they can't see the other side. Deep to keep out the rabbits. Gee, I don't even know how deep you'd have to go for groundhogs. Maybe a moat?
marcella
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electric wire. It is only about 4 feet high but has worked like a charm this season. Not going to do much for rabbits unless you have one real close to the ground. We have 3 rows with one being the ground wire. Lowes or Home depot and we did it for less than $50.00. MJ
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For groundhogs 6 inches to one foot deep - then one to two feet away from the fence. An "L" shape is needed. The critters go up to the fence then try to dig under the fence. They run into the wire and stop. Some groundhogs can dig three feet deep. Also for the high end it "may" be best not to secure the top 3 feet of that six foot fence, if the critters decide to climb it the top, the fence can droop back so they cannot climb it. Electric wire is cool too - change that - make it hot :)
Just some thoughts - Fences are not cheap. It may be best to give the deer and critters what they want at the outer fringe of the garden. Shrubs can also make a cool looking fence, but it takes time. Some deer can jump a six foot fence. There are deer resistant plants as well. I prefer the dog myself :)
Good thing you you don't have squirrels :)
Enjoy Life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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So a groundhog will climb a fence? If so I will need to add another electric wire spaced for the groundhog. Right now I have installed a 3ft rabbit fence with electric wires at 4ft and 5ft. So far so good.

The deer simply eat too much. Last year I had two dozen tomato plants and did not get a single tomato.
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I should have been clearer, other critters climb like squirrels and raccoons. Sounds like you have it covered.

Its is possible to put wire cages around each plant. I do this with the lettuces and other smaller plants. Those wire hanging baskets placed upside down works to some degree also.
There are several apple and pear trees away from the garden. The deer seem content to hangout by those trees and avoid the garden most of the time. That is until a few weeks from ThanksGiving :)
I still prefer the Dog for critters. Chickens for the bugs one hour in the garden before closing them up at night. The wire baskets keep chickens from the lettuce.
Enjoy life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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Netting will deter deer as will chicken wire. Need not be solid. Groundhogs are tough as they will burrow under. Hav-a-hart works well for groundhogs.
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On Mon, 20 Jul 2009 09:41:47 -0700 (PDT), Frank

A 3 wire electric fence does a wonderful job of keeping the deer out.
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Susan N.

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I like the idea of electric but I'm wondering if it will stop the deer or just cause a lot of wild thrashing once they have jumped into it? If I start with a 3ft rabbit fence and then run electric wires at 4ft, 5ft, and 6ft does anyone think that would be effective? Thanks.
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wrote:

I like the idea of electric but I'm wondering if it will stop the deer or just cause a lot of wild thrashing once they have jumped into it? If I start with a 3ft rabbit fence and then run electric wires at 4ft, 5ft, and 6ft does anyone think that would be effective? Thanks.
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The deer have to touch the wire before they know not to enter. Deer normally don't jump over anything their body actually touches in their jump. They may investigate first by sight and smell, but not touch.
3 widely separated electrified wires may work as they may tend to go between the wires, rather than over it. Hopefully, they will bolt out of the garden, rather than into it.
--
Dave



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Frank wrote:

What do you use for bait for groundhogs?
EJ in NJ
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Apple
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Cat food works for raccoons.
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Peanut butter works best.
Setting the trap on a usual route, by a regular food source (pref. outside the garden) or right by a hole works.
Close the traps at night if you don't want to catch skunks, raccoons or cats. ...some cats just love peanut butter and will quite happily test the trap for you any time of day...
Do check the traps regularly. Squirrels like peanut butter too and will take turns in the trap.
Do not leave any animal in a trap overnight. Raccoons will mangle them.
Do not leave a skunk in the trap through the day. They can die of stress.
Getting a skunk out of the trap without getting sprayed is an easy enough procedure but requires some knowledge.
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phorbin wrote:

Thanks everybody for the ideas. He has been raiding my compost and digging up the cantaloupe scraps. I caught it with Cantaloupe.
EJ in NJ
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Hmmm ...
Again for the tough groundhogs use the "L" shape for the buried fence wire. Also if one whistles the groundhogs may standup to check where the sound is coming from -- making them an easier target :O
Enjoy Life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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We use 4' chicken wire supported by those inexpensive green metal fence posts. The deer don't come close to the homes because almost everyone out here have dogs. The rabbits and other small animals do raid gardens at night.
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I'm assuming you live in a rural area. If its the permanent location for your garden, this how I would do it. Mark the perimeter about 3' further out from your current garden. This maintains a pathway around the perimeter of the garden. Dig a trench about a foot deep, a foot wide, add some 3/8" rebar offset from center to allow fence post installation, and pour a concrete curb for provisions for fence posts. While you're pouring the concrete for the curb, install the fence posts and brace until the concrete is set. Use 6' or higher heavy pasture fencing. You might try hardware cloth on the bottom for little varmints, then the regular fencing above that. You need to get inside the fenced area. Build and assemble a gate of same height. You'll need the mounting hardware and a gate latch. Don't trip over the curb...
A few inexpensive solar-powered ornamental lights may aid in sighting night animals that circumvent your fence.
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2009 15:35:31 -0700, Davej wrote:

I'm using fox and coyote urine this year, it seems to have deterred the groundhogs. The acid test will be next month when the corn is ready, then I'll see if it works with raccoons.
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