Edible Seasonal Passive Sunshade

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In Edible Seasonal Passive Sunshade on Fri, 01 Apr 2005 17:38:52 -0500, by jetgraphics, we read:

One option for you is the Kiwi. Originally from New Zealand this is a hardy plant that branches and grows fast and can reach 35 feet in height. It can be trained or let grow where it will.
I built a screen using a system of 4x4 posts and 4x8 sheets of trellis. I reinforced the trellis wall with 16 gauge wire between the vertical posts.
This plant is sexed, so plant a male and a female in order to get fruit.
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jetgraphics wrote:

pumpkins in the rear of our garden and in the sideyard, next to the house because it's that much less grass to cut. The pumpkins in the back grow on a 9 foot tall pipe trellis every year because I grow other plants on the same trellis under them - tomatoes and beans last year. (The lower level of plants is not shaded much by the pumpkins because of their much lower height and the East/West orientation of the trellis.)
I don't grow monster pumpkins, just smaller, cooking pumpkins, and the fruit manages to hang quite nicely all on their own without falling off and bashing innocent bystanders.
They give me a nice shady spot to boot when I "train" the vines to go up and across right where I plant my own butt on my bench by using some heavy cording. The only down side is removing the dead plants in the fall!
You might also want to consider hanging planters for both vining and non-vining plants as more passive shading. That way you could have the flexibility of extending the shaded period by planting cold-weather plants in the early spring and fall.
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Evelyn McHugh wrote:

I hope you don't mind me replying. I'm checking my Mac set-ups. Last year, I found pole beans very good for passive sunshade. Their leaves are a good size. I grew Kentucky Wonders. This year I will put in a lot more as they are good for canning and freezing.
I know morning glories aren't edible but I'm using those for passive shade on the greenhouse west side this summer.
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Ok, removable trellises...
If you are going to grow squash, pumpkins, or other vining "veggies" that die back in the winter, just use a disposable trellis! :-)
Make a trellis out of hemp cording. That way, when the vines die or freeze, you just cut the entire string trellis down and discard it...
I've never done it, but I've read about it!
Dead vine removal is a mess. :-P
--
K.

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jetgraphics wrote:

Collected posts: ----------- Consider Malabar Spinach an annual.Grapesmaybeofinterestalso. Mix in moon flowers and other flowering vines for interest...NOT Edible. ----------- In addition to the above, Not quite edible, perhaps useful if you brew your own beer though, is hops.Youcouldtrainsomeindeterminate tomatos, some pole beans, maybe a small melon or summer squash?? Lots of plants that are edible have a vining habit. ---------------- Grapevines? :-) The only problem with those is that they lose their leaves in the winter.
You could also try Passiflora edulis or Passiflora incarnata. Those both produce edible fruits, and they tend to be evergreen.
My Passiflora cerulea stayed green all winter thru 4 or 5 good freezes. I want to find some of the other two species and get them planted here as well.
Plastic lattice as a trellis looks nice and is more durable than wood lattice. It's more expensive but lasts forever, and it comes in colors! ----------------- Have you tried the "choko" ---------------- Honeysuckle is sorta nice and moderatly easy to maintain where you want it. But its not edible. Smells really nice though. ------------------ Check with your county agricultural extension office.Itmaybelisted under the state college (in New York, it is Cornell Extension office). Their information and publications are mostly free and will be geared to your exact location.Theyalsousuallyarethebasefor4-Hgroupsandyou could get information through them.
In China, they grow grape vines that shade pig runs.Theflooroftheruns (cement) is slightly sloped so that when hosed down, the water and manure flow to water and fertilize the vines.Multipleuse. ---------------------- Kiwis wouldbeagoodchoice(ifyou'rewillingtoconsiderperennials). There are hardy varieties than can be grown to zone 4, or the more familiar fuzzy varieties, which are hardy to zone 8 and might be ok in zone 7 if you got lucky. They're fairly attractive and grow quickly, but take a while before they'll start giving fruit. But would be lower maintenance than annual vines, and you'll eventually get a lot more height out of them.
The problem you will run into with most typical climbing vegetables is that they don't grow that tall. You might be able to get about 8 ft out of pole beans, and 10-15 ft out of some types of runner beans, but that'll be about it. Curcubits (squash, cukes, pumpkins, etc.) will probably top out at around 6-8 ft. They (both beans and curcubits) also are fairly prone to a variety of pests: leaf-eating insects, soil dwelling insects, and various mildews and so on. Doesn't mean you shouldn't try them; just means they're one of those plants that can be hit-or-miss, even for experienced gardeners.
If I were you, I'd experiment with the edible shade concept for now, but also plant a proper row of quick-maturing shade trees. By the time the trees get taller than the crop plants, you'll probably be sick of trying to grow dinner on the side of your house and be ready to move your efforts to a proper garden space. -------------------- I use Thompson Seedless grapes on trellises.Plentybushy,plenty shady, need little to no water, makes wine, grapes, raisins. ----------------------

I'd allow at least four feet, both for ease of access during harvest and pruning and to minimize the likelyhood of creepers bridging the gap.

>> shade, plant some trees. >Shade trees aren't the best solution in this area. Unfortunately, due to the >clay soil, trees are susceptible to knockdown after soaking rains and >windstorms. Use trees with tap roots--like pecans. When planting, dig a hole as deep as you can with a posthole digger (rent a power augur if doing more than a few holes; much less work, and you can go deeper). Dump a pound or two of fertilizer into the holes, then add 10-15 gallons of water (I just fill the hole a couple of times). Break up some of the clay from the holes, mix with some peat moss, compost, topsoil, and a bit of plant food; use this to backfill the hole and surround the tree roots when you plant the tree. Save a bit of the mix for filling in around the trees, as the mix will settle. Use the leftover clay for landscaping. This approach gives the tree a good environment to start growing, an easy path for the tap root to follow, and a great boost at the bottom to really anchor it. And, using pecans also means a crop to gather in late fall. Pecans should be planted at least 40' apart. ---------------------------------- Just a thought. We used wire one year to allow climbers to climb. Burnt the stems. And we are only in zone 5b. ----------------------- Also, string beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and melons will climb a trellis.Considerdippergourdsandloofahs. ------------------------ Besides grapvines, you might consider pumpkins and squash. I grow pumpkins in the rear of our garden and in the sideyard, next to the house because it's that much less grass to cut. The pumpkins in the back grow on a 9 foot tall pipe trellis every year because I grow other plants on the same trellis under them - tomatoes and beans last year. (The lower level of plants is not shaded much by the pumpkins because of their much lower height and the East/West orientation of the trellis.)
I don't grow monster pumpkins, just smaller, cooking pumpkins, and the fruit manages to hang quite nicely all on their own without falling off and bashing innocent bystanders.
They give me a nice shady spot to boot when I "train" the vines to go up and across right where I plant my own butt on my bench by using some heavy cording. The only down side is removing the dead plants in the fall!
You might also want to consider hanging planters for both vining and non-vining plants as more passive shading. That way you could have the flexibility of extending the shaded period by planting cold-weather plants in the early spring and fall. ----------------------
Ok, removable trellises...
If you are going to grow squash, pumpkins, or other vining "veggies" that die back in the winter, just use a disposable trellis! :-)
Make a trellis out of hemp cording. That way, when the vines die or freeze, you just cut the entire string trellis down and discard it...
-----------------------------
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