Edible berry?

Hello
There have been many posts about edible berries but I could not find anything that looks like the one I'm after so please forgive a newbie if this has been handled before.
I have a 6m tree/shrub in my garden with black berries, end of June / beginning of July in central London, England. The tree attracts wood pigeons. I tasted the berries and they are sweet with low acidity and a slight almond aftertaste (cyanide??? heeelp!!!). I made a jam and then decided to post on this forum before I went ahead and poisoned my whole family :-)
My guess is that it is some sort of whitebeam (the leaves are slightly whiter below than above.)
I am including a few photos. If anyone out there has sufficient expertise to give me a definite identification I would be ever so grateful.
Jossy
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Jossy


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Jossy said:

whole
No, I don't think that this is any sort of whitebeam (Sorbus). It looks to me like it could be a serviceberry (one of several North American Amelanchier species or one of the hybrids developed for use in ornamental landscaping.
Quoting the Wikipedia article, "The fruit of several species are excellent to eat raw, tasting somewhat like a blueberry, strongly accented by the almond-like flavour of the seeds."
The ones I've tasted (A. alnifolia, A. x 'Autumn Brilliance') remind me a bit of blueberries, with a hint of prunes.
The winter buds of Amelanchiers are very distinctive; conspicuous, pointed, slightly recurved, and quite diagnostic. (I'm surprised that I wasn't able to find an image of them with a quick search.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amelanchier http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Juneberries.html
Amelanchiers have become fairly common as ornamental shrubs or small multistemmed trees in the past decade or so.

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Pat in Plymouth MI

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I forgot to add that the tree has white flowers in the spring that turn to a light pink.
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year , The bolg wriet goo
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ter001

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