Early pole bean

I am growing the Borlotti "Fire Tongue" type, which have fabulous taste, but every year in early october (first frost) I have big vines covered in green pods, with more pods on the vine than in the freezer. This heirloom is perhaps best for a gardener 200 miles to the south.
I mostly fresh-freeze them for the winter. Next year I will be looking for an earlier type. I still want a pole bean because cabbage and other greens like the shade and nitrogen that these plants provide. I am well aware that scarlet runner beans are precocious, but I don't know about taste and productivity. The Borlotti have great taste but I never met a fresh bean that I did not like, so I will be looking for a productive early pole shelling bean. Suggestions anyone?
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simy1 wrote:

I grew "Rattlesnake" this year, and they were a lot earlier than the Romanos. Next year I will plant only Rattlesnake instead of half-n-half.
I grew them for snaps, so I don't know about for shelling. HTH
Bob
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simy1 said:

saved seed for many years from seed given to be by a co-worker. (I bought seeds once to grow side by side for comparison.) Their 'Northeaster' is also a pretty good bean.
http://www.johnnyseeds.com
Once you do get a pole bean you really like, be sure to save your own seeds.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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I definitely agree. I've been growing the same pole bean for over 30 years & the gentleman who gave me the original seeds for over 60 years. Steve

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Steve Peek wrote:

Thanks to both of you. I am already saving a variety of romano beans which is very early for snap beans. Besides being early, with a tremendous first flush, I like the taste a lot. But it has been discontinued at Territorial because if you let go those pods even one week they become very tough. Also, it does not do much after the first flush. But grown together with some more standard snap beans, it is perfect. Garden of Eden or Northeaster it is.
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Pat Kiewicz wrote:

I went in there and GoE did look like a good shelling bean, not much pod, long row of beans. But Northeaster looks like a typical romano, big pods with small, sparse seeds. Yes, romanos are very early for pods, and my romanos are in the pod drying stage right now (for seed saving), but I would never characterize them as productive for shelling.
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The best for me me has been the pole type horticultural or cranberry beans (Wrens Egg) . They were widely grown in the mid Atlantic for green shelling beans (October beans) getting hard to find seeds, but they have a relatively short maturity.
simy1 wrote:

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