Drip irrigation, not pressurized

Page 2 of 2  


An easier way to do it is to just get some plastic downpipe such as plumbers use. Drill holes in it and fill it with water each time you are there. You could also just dig holes and put plastic flower posts int he hole up to their top and fill them with water.
Here is Oz there are heaps of ways of tricks used to keep beds moist in weeks of above the ton temperatures and in drought conditions. Perhaps the best thing you can do is to mulch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FarmI wrote:

How does the water get out of the pot? Through the drain hole?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One to two inches of water is all that is needed for most vegetable plants. However the type of soil and the amount of rain you get need to be taken into account. Sandy soil will need more water and clay needs less.
It is better to put more water around the plants less often. It soaks in deeper.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
doofy wrote:

It will work if you can get the reservoir 10 feet off the ground, and put some kind of timer on it to only drip a couple hours per day.
I set up a cheap drip irrigation system for my garden in central Texas when I lived there; it operated on just a few PSI water pressure (supplied by city water and a regulator.) I watered about an hour or two every other day during the early afternoon when it was really hot. The rows were mulched to retain moisture. That was the best garden I ever had.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.