Damaged tomato plant survival/production?

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Dr. wrote:

You bet! Every year we put in about 35 varieties for a total of 90-110 plants. One year we dug in this hard clay like soil which was pretty dry with a post hole digger about 18" deep. We then put in our plants to the top two leaves. Some of the tomatoes had almost snapped stems due to the "help" of our 5 and 1 yo children. Then we received unexpectly 3" of rain in a 24 hour period. The tomatoes sank until they were (some of them) in a 6" hole. We did what we always do - caged them (6' high cattle fencing), newspapered around them and in the 4 foot rows between them, then heavily strawed. Our plants were about our average - 7 feet tall by 4 feet wide and the yield was great. '

great flavor

love all the brandywines

difficult to clean

Love them - make great "green tomato pickles"
Also you might like -
Ivory egg (bushy, very prolific, duck egg size ivory)
Chocolate Plum (Tall, water tolerant, make the best paste I have ever eaten or dried)
Snow white (beautiful large slicer that makes wonderful "ivory" tomato sauce)
Orange Oxheart (very low acid, huge. Literally the size of an ox heart. Beautiful slicer moderate producer)
Good luck, Mutti Sabo Illinois
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a
year.
good
Well, I've received some very positive replies regarding my topped plant. It still looks just as healty as the rest of them, so I think it will be just fine.
I'm rather new to gardening. Bought the house 4 years ago, and have had a garden for 3. This is the 2nd year I've started my tomatoes and peppers from seed. Last year everything turned out great. Hopefully this year will be good also. The only concern is the size of the seedlings. After 7 weeks, they were gigantic. Not leggy, just huge. I left them on the heat mat the whole time, which may have caused that. Next year, I'll either start them later, or take them off the mat after germination.

their
Agreed. I grew this one last year. I never knew tomatoes could taste that good.

Also grew this one last year. All the rest I listed I'm growing for the first time.

Thanks for those suggestions. I've taken note of them. Next year will probably be mostly new varieties, along with a few favorites from this year. The 1884 I believe will always have a spot or two reserved for it.
Gary

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Same with most produce. Once you've had tree-ripened fruit, the stuff in the grocery is just -- inedible. Especially peaches!! I swear you could use the grocery peaches for baseballs.
~REZ~
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On Fri, 14 May 2004 17:38:42 -0400, Dr. wrote:

(clip)
(clip) I planted Druzba this year, along with 3 other heirloom varieties. I was planting early, rushing the season and all got caught by a frost. Druzba has proven to be the least cold-hardy of the lot. Although several of the others were damaged by the frost, most of them have recovered. I lost exactly 1/2 of the Druzba.
Bill
--
http://cannaday.us (genealogy)
http://organic-earth.com (organic gardening)
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Ouch. I'll make not of that.
Thanks, Gary
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not_a_real snipped-for-privacy@fakedseizure.com writes:

I had planned to buy a Mortgage Lifter this year and manage to not do it. :-(

I went to your web page, but my browser shows only broken links. :-(
Glenna
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