Corn DOA

Well, for some reason this year my corn stalks didn't produce anything. No tassles and just a little bulge where there should be an ear. Anyway, I am assuming it's because of a lack of pollination.
My question is, what do I do with the corn stalks? Can I just bury them in the soil and let them decompose there? Would they be sufficiently decomposed by next spring?
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FDR said:

One of my blocks of corn failed to silk so was a total dud. I have no idea why, as it wasn't treated any differently than any other block. I guess these things happen...

I'd suggest chopping them up roughly, then turning them in. The stalks will likely rot easily. The base of the stem and clump of roots, not as well.
Hedge shears are what's used to chop up corn stalks for my compost.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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Thanks Pat :)

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FDR wrote:

Well wait a minute. That doesn't make any sense. Lack of pollination can't cause no tassels to form. A lack of tassels sure would assure a lack of pollination though. I would think your first question would be why the corn plants didn't mature. Did they all get to a normal height? Are you sure they are done growing? If you really meant to say there were no corn silks and they did actually produce tassels, that's not as hard to believe. That could be caused by severe over crowding. Even with crowding, the plants around the edge of the patch should be able to produce an ear of corn, I would think.
Steve
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I wasn't clear in my post. A few weeks ago tassels appeared along with the small bulge that the corn would be in. I hadn't been able to keep up with my garden lately being away for a while on vacation. But I noticed yesterday that the tassels were missing and the bulge remained the same size. The cotn stalk is a early season variety that was planted at the beginning of June and is close to six feet tall. The corn was crowded a bit I guess. The variety is fleet, and was supposed to be for this northern climate. The stalks are starting to redden and some leaves appear to be yellowing and dying off.
I have another set of corn called Tempatation that has reached 3 feet or 4 and has tassles now. I may try to hand pollinate, but it seems that the stalks are sort of small and won't produce much.
I probably should ditch corn next year and just go with crops that are easier to grow.
Rob
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On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 16:07:16 GMT, "FDR"

I ditched corn after my first year because the ants swarmed (and I mean really swarmed) all over it. It was truly disgusting. Sue

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I'd just like a chance to taste a freshly picked ear of corn. Oh well....

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Hi All, I would let the corn stalks dry out, set fire to them, and then turn the ash in to the ground. Hope this helps you.
Richard M. Watkin.

No
am
in
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Ashes are base, not acid. Just like limestone.
John!
FDR wrote:

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I believe it is the sulfur in coal that causes acid rain, but I may be wrong. To make lye I would use wood ashes, that certainly is not acidic.
John!
FDR wrote:

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GA Pinhead wrote:

Further the ash is solid and basic, the sulfur containing part acidic and gaseous. Fire in a way separates the two.
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Makes sense.
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On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 04:45:51 GMT, "FDR"

My recollection goes back to the late 1930's on the farm, and I can never remember corn not producing because of a like of pollination.
Now I am not talking about hybrid corn, which got popular in the late 40's where we were(but you had to buy your seed each year and we didn't use it at first).
Here is what we did with stalks. First we "striped fodder" from the ear down, we bundled it and put it into the barn for cattle and horse feed. then we "cut tops", just above the ear and shocked them for live stock feed. After the corn had cured, we pulled the ears and had a "corn shucking"(a gathering of friends and neighbors to shuck the corn , feast and sometimes a dance.
Then we cut and gathered stalks and burned them. That is the way we controlled insect and disease. The only chemical we ever used was Bluestone(copper sulfate) that we put in next years seed corn to keep out weevils .
Corn is one of the easiest things to grow (provided you have a reasonable amount of moisture). You can raise it in pure sand, or heavy clay- -if you use commercial fertilizer. Next spring, if you like, lay you off a 100 ft row, sprinkle 1 cup of a balanced fertilizer like 10-10-10, it will be very thin. work the fertilizer into the soil good, and then plant your corn. Use a corn that is recommended for your zone in the seed catalogue . When the corn is knee high, rake you a small ditch along side the corn and apply 1 cup of ammonium nitrate, and cover it with dirt (this is called "siding".) After the first rain your corn will turn a very dark green and grow very rapidly. If you want to increase your yield, side again with 10-10-10 when the first tassels show.(1 cup). Oh yes, plant your corn as thick as you like, but thin it to 6" or more after it is all up good.
Now you have a good day, and don't give up on the corn. The Old Timer.
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wrote:

Just one row?
sprinkle 1 cup of a balanced

1 Cup per 100 ft? Hmm, I put 10-10-10 in when I planted but it was more than that.
work the fertilizer

Yep, did that. Checked with the local coop too.

Thanks old timer!
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On Wed, 10 Aug 2005 01:15:14 GMT, "FDR"

Most people over fertilize: You can add more later but you can't take away, once applied. Think of your fertilizer as you would a bottle of Asprin: Two tablets will cure your headache, four will upset your stomach, and the whole bottle might kill you.
Anyway, all we are trying to do at first is give the corn a start, the real kicker is the Ammonia Nitrate, the second application of 10-10-10 is to insure that the plant has the correct nutrients to produce a good crop.
Have a good day-Old Timer

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