collecting seeds from koriander and other herbs

As an extension of my last post, any suggestions on how to properly fetch viable seeds from koriander plants and other herbs? I have quite a lot of koriander plants (about 1000) that have flowered since a couple weeks ago and I want lots of good seeds for next year.
Dominic
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I only know how to do it by hand which is going to be backbreaking with 1000 plants. I leaves the seed head on the plant until it looks brown and dryish and then rub the head between my hands, if the seed is mature and dry the tissue around it will break releasing the seeds which fall into my hands or on to paper that I have put underneath. If the seed is still green leave it longer on the plant.
You will get maybe 30 to 70 seeds per plant (rough guess) and the viability is quite high so you may not need to do all 1000 plants unless planning on a few acres for next year. Since coriander seed can be purchased in bulk quite cheaply you would think there must be a way to do it that is simpler but I don't know what that is.
David
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On Sun, 21 Aug 2005, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Thanks bunches! I am curious about bulk suppliers, anywhere on the planet for such things. Actually I wanted celantro, which apparently is not the same plant. Here in Sweden they charged me several dollars for only about koriander 100 seeds, and just after I planted them a friend came buy, laughed, and out of sympathy just gave me over a thousand seeds. Most importantly, his seeds had much higher growability (nearly 100%) than the commercial ones (less than 50%). I bought celantro from the same supplier and none of the roughly 100 seeds ever popped up out of the soil. I would like to find a good source for this.
Dominic
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.

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On Thu, 8 Sep 2005, BinaryBill wrote:

Not sure yet. I thought I had this figured out, but maybe not.
Cilantro is by some accounts Coriandrum sativum, and the latin scientific name is definitely koriander that is believed to have originated in the Mediterranean. By other accounts, Cilantro, also spelled "Culantro" is Eryngium foetidum, an entirely different plant looking nothing like koriander that is indigenous to the West Indies that tastes like koriander and is commonly used in Central American cooking. This plant is not thought to have originated in the Mediterranean and is indigenous to Central America. The common Mexican terminology for Eryngium foetidum is apparently "Cilantro extranjero", or simply "Cilantro". I was recently at a BBQ with some native American indians from Central America and when I mentioned Cilantro or Culantro, they seemed to clearly recognize I did not mean koriander and clearly understood that Eryngium foetidum was Cilantro which was same as "Cilantro extranjero". They pointed me to a local grocer of columbian decent that sold large bags of Eryngium foetidum seeds.
I would be very greatful if there is an academic here with good working knowledge of plant systematics who could clarify this discrepancy.
Dominic
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Dominic-Luc Webb wrote:

"Cilantro" is the name used for this plant in American English. It is called "coriander" in English. Here in California, I've never seen it used to mean a different plant.

Here in California, Mexican dishes use the same Coriandrum sativum as Indian or Vietnamese dishes. The other herb, Eryngium foetidum, may look different but it's not that different, both are in the carrot family. The English name is apparently "long coriander".
[...] This plant is not thought to have originated in the

Apparently the same terminology is used as far as Thailand. You can find lots of information about herbs and spices, including their names in many languages, here:
http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer /
Paulo
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Thanks bunches Paulo and also Susan, who also sent same link. I'll definitely bookmark this one!
Dominic-Luc Webb
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Commonly, the leaves of this annual plant are called cilantro, a Spanish name--while the seeds take their name from the Greek koros, or "bug," for their reputedly "buggy" smell while still unripe.

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On Thu, 15 Sep 2005, **Developer** wrote:

So it seems. I think Cilantro in Spanish has several variants. Cilantro extranjero, for instance, is not Koriander. The "extranjero" appendage to the name indicates (by several accounts) Eryngium foetidum, sometimes called "Culantro". Culantro is soemtimes identified as koriander, perhaps it is just not spelled exactly right. This creates some confusion.
Dominic-Luc Webb
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wrote:

Here is an excellent reference for the names of herbs and spices in many languages. http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl / He also gives the Latin name.
--
Susan N.

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But is coriander a spice or a herb? Technically, the word coriander can be used to describe the entire plant: leaves, stems, seeds, and all. However, when speaking of coriander, most people are referring to the spice produced from the seeds of the plant. The leaves of the plant are commonly called cilantro, which comes from the Spanish word for coriander.

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**Developer** wrote:

Depends on how you use the two words. Herb equals flavoring plant material that can be locally grown. Spice equals flavoring plant material that can not be locally grown without special equipment. Local vs remote. It's not the official definition set, but some people appear to use a similar sort of distinction.
So to me basil is an herb (it's growing in my balcony) while nutmeg is a spice (I would need a hothouse to grow a nutmeg bush).
There's also seed vs rest of plant, making cinnimon an herb and peanut butter a spice.
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