cold frames up against south side garage

I've never actually had a cold frame. I did build a 50' long hoop greenhouse once, but haven't tried using a cold frame to extend the growing season.
Our new house has a roughly 25' wide south facing wall on the outside of our attached garage. It gets a lot of sun. I wanted to have a lean-to greenhouse, but it is within 12' or so of the property line, and I doubt I could get away with the greenhouse. A small row of cold frames, on the other hand, might work out.
Can anyone give me some ideas on materials to use? I'm thinking of using wood and polycarbonate panels, and perhaps insulating the inside of the wood - or would the outside be better? I'd like them to be several feet deep. Even just standing next to that wall outside on a cold but windless day, you can feel quite warm.
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I just built one for my wife last October. Ours backs up against the greenhouse which backs up against the south side of the house. It's 14' long and 3' deep, 2.5' high in back and 1' high in front. It has a foundation or base of 4" x 4" treated lumber and a frame of 2' X 4" treated lumber.
I made the sides from double-walled polycarbonate panels left over from the greenhouse construction but the front is plywood, just in case I get careless and kick it while loading or unloading plants. The top is two doors, hinged at the high side, made of 2" X 2" treated lumber frames holding sheets of polycarbonate. Given the slope from back to front, snow and rain run off. Almost forgot; I used gravel to allow a path for water in the coldframe to drain to the outside.
Although it's been in the 'teens here in Maryland, my wife reports that there are a lot of happy mums in her cold frame.
Paul
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Old windows and doors, with the glass panes intact, are what we have tried to use. Build up the sides with , oh, 1x6 or 2x6, hinge your lid and you are good to go. Use a few sticks, of differing lengths, to raise the cover/ventilate when days are warmer.
ttfn.... Linda H.
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Linda Hungerford wrote:

Glass is fine. Polycarbonate sans a UV barrier will deteriorate. Outdoor use polycarb will be labeled with which surface is treated.
Jeff

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