Can I freeze tomatoes until I have enough to can a batch?

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Actually, Heintz is quite decent. I don't eat a lot of it, but I like that brand quite a bit when I do...
If I make a cooked down "tomato sauce" for canning or freezing, it's generally flavored Italian style, or sometimes made into a Salsa/Picante.
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Peace! Om

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wrote:

Tomato sauce is just tomatoes, peeled, de-seeded, acidified and reduced.
Tomato sauce rom NCHFP:
Prepare and press as for making tomato juice. Simmer in large-diameter saucepan until sauce reaches desired consistency Boil until volume is reduced by about one-third for thin sauce, or by one-half for thick sauce. Add bottled lemon juice or citric acid to jars.
For lots more work, Tomato ketchup from NCHFP
* 24 lbs ripe tomatoes * 3 cups chopped onions * 3/4 tsp ground red pepper (cayenne) * 3 cups cider vinegar (5 percent) * 4 tsp whole cloves * 3 sticks cinnamon, crushed * 1-1/2 tsp whole allspice * 3 tbsp celery seeds * 1-1/2 cups sugar * 1/4 cup salt Wash tomatoes. Dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split. Dip in cold water. Slip off skins and remove cores. Quarter tomatoes into 4-gallon stock pot or a large kettle. Add onions and red pepper. Bring to boil and simmer 20 minutes, uncovered. Combine spices in a spice bag and add to vinegar in a 2-quart saucepan. Bring to boil. Cover, turn off heat and hold tomato mixture for 20 minutes. Then, remove spice bag and combine vinegar and tomato mixture. Boil about 30 minutes. Put boiled mixture through a food mill or sieve. Return to pot. Add sugar and salt, boil gently, and stir frequently until volume is reduced by one-half or until mixture rounds up on spoon without separation.
Ross.
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Fuck that, what's the point? It's like going to the trouble of squishing grapes, fermenting it, letting it spoil just to make vinegar.
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Want vinegar? A little left over red wine, some extra sugar, and a kombucha culture.
I've been cooking with some of the best red wine vinegar made that way lately!
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shoom. right over your head.
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Ditto babe.
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Nah, 'shroom, right over your head, if you ain't sitting on it, you may have notice that this is a group of adults. If you need a scatological crutch for writing, you may be happier in another news group where feral adolescents and potty mouths are more common. Probably never heard of "balsamic" either.
Oh yeah, you raise an interesting point Om. Fresh garden tomatoes are obviously better than those red cardboard things that are sold commercially but I'm thinkin' that cooked romas (garden or store bought) probably taste the same. Of course with the store bought you get the value added of pesticide residues without the burden of additional nutrients (bioflavonoids) that comes from plants struggling under less than ideal environments (gardens). But all the same, my impression is that cooking a store bought tomato improves it, perhaps even to rivaling the REAL deal.
Any opinions?
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In article

Have you ever grown Romas? I have. The home garden ones are much richer and sweeter. ;-d
My favorite are plum tomatoes.
Even sweet 100's can be peeled and stored. They are so small, blanch them and pop them out of the entire skin with a gentle pinch. Not as much work as you'd imagine.

See above. :-)
There never is, and probably never will be, a good comparison in flavor between store bought and vine ripe tomatoes. The only ones that come close are the cluster "on the vine" tomatoes that our local store sells. They are worth the premium price, but I'd still rather hit the local farmers market if I've none of my own on hand.
If I over-produce (which is common for tomatoes in season sometimes), I'll just use the smaller pressure cooker and can a few in a couple of 1 pint jars.
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<grins>
While I've never made Ketchup, I totally understand the concept. ;-) With what I have to pay for water here in the city, it's cheaper to buy veggies, but there just is no substitute for the flavor of home grown tomatoes!
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"Steve Young" <bowtieATbrightdslDOTnet> wrote in message --
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No argument from me other than flavor can benefit from minimal advance processing...
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Robert Lewis wrote:

If this is for just a short term, freeze them whole without peeling. When you thaw them, the skins will slip off. They will also be mushy (much nastier texture than canned tomatoes), but still OK for cooking. You might mix them with your main crop when it comes in for making salsa or ketchup or something.
If you're gonna freeze them for a couple of years, blanch and peel them first. They'll taste better, and take up less space that way.
HTH, Bob
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