Been looking for a device for attaching vines

I've had a 1.5 inch nail that had soft lead attached to it. Theory was to drive in the nail then fold the lead over the vine. Trouble is I can't remember what it is called. Any idea?
PS Truth be known I use it for adding weight to my toilet flapper but it was designed for holding up vines. Just got in from looking about in my garage and found all sorts of things I forgot I had but came up empty on the vine lead spike.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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Sorry to bother you.
just found
http://www.epinions.com/prices/Bosmere_H195_10_Pack_Lead_Headed_Vine_Supp ort_Nails_Bosmere
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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Bill, out of curiosity, tell me why you can't use string or strips of cloth to secure the vine.
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- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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In article

These were designed to attach to brick walls or dead hard wood. I saw the use also a way to add lead weight to almost anything in an environment under water. My toilets. Seems they are good for about ten years here under water. The he original use is viable too but I in my plant world I use twine and these things.
I like Velcro ties but it seem the best were replaced with lesser quality and now if I go here
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/c-225-trellis-clips-twine.aspx
I find nothing of use.
At least my old stuff is viable for awhile.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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On 11/11/2010 3:33 PM, Bill who putters wrote:

We use cotton twine to tie stuff up, including tomato plants and other veggies. Lots cheaper than any of the other stuff and is biodegradable. At the end of the season I just toss the used twine into the compost heap and it's gone by next spring.
Have also used torn panty hose, stretchable, knots nicely, already been paid for once so no further charge. That goes into the trash when it's worn out. On occasion have used old cotton tee shirts torn into strips, those pieces get composted too.
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On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 15:21:00 -0600, George Shirley

I use nylon stockings too. I bought a bag full of them for a couple of dollars several years back. Still have plenty. They work very well on tomato plants and do not cut the stems.
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George Shirley wrote:

I picked up a big roll of some kind of "twine" by the side of the road - literally. It looked like the stuff used to fasten the ends of cane etc in hand made baskets. So I used it to tie up a whole lot of things. Then I discovered that when it gets wet it turns to sludge. Everything fell of the trellises! Bugger.
David
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Hmm, never thought of using stockings, i've always just used basic string! But as you say the plant can sometimes grow into it slightly...
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