apple question ......

Page 1 of 2  
I live in south Texas and would love to grow some graventastein apples. Could any of you tell me if its possible in the part of the country ? I have been here en years and have never seen nor heard about any grown here. Would love to have them growing in my back yard. Thank you kindly, kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

I'm a looooong way from south Texas so I have no first hand experience with growing there. I do know that most apples require a prolonged time of cold weather to do well. They need the cold to go dormant but they also need a certain number of hours (days) of cold weather so they know when to wake back up. Apples grown where it stays too warm don't go dormant properly and then they try to stay dormant, finally starting to grow with one branch leafing back out but others not yet. Each variety of apple has it's own requirement for chill time. There are a few low chill varieties that can do well pretty far into the south. Maybe some southern apple grower will offer some advice on which ones are worth trying.
Steve in the Adirondacks of northern NY
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve wrote:

Thank you Steve, I was afraid I'd hear that. Oh well, I guess I will have to be happy with my oranges, lemons, figs, papaya and tangerines. All new to me . I am also, from the north. An apple would make a fine salad though. Can't have everything. I would love to grow some nuts. Maybe I'll settle for that next. I haven't heard of anyone growing apples around here. The reason I decided to check with you good folk. many thanks, Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 05 Nov 2005 10:18:42 -0600, Kate wrote:

Kate, depending on how far south you live you may be able to grow Gala's and Granny smith apples. Some catalogue (stark bro's) say that Granny's will grow in northern zone 9 and Galas to southern zone 8.
I'm going to try them next year. I'm on the border of 8 & 9. Pan Ohco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pan Ohco wrote:

I hope you will let us know how it goes. I am not sure we could grow them here. But would love to try. We are in a severe drought. I wouldn't try growing apples this year. If the drought lets up , maybe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

I would love to be able to try all the things you can grow there, but don't give up on the idea of apples yet. Check this web site (actually, I see that Doug beat me to this one but I'll post it anyway: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG368 Take note of table one, near the bottom of the page.
Here is a way to estimate the chill hours you receive at your location:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/stonefruit/images/Chill.jpg
That chart probably only works for southern areas. In the north, several months would be off the chart and temperatures too cold don't count anyway because the tree is so dormant, it stops "counting". To make that work, you will have to figure out the mean temperature of your colder months. It looks like you need some months with mean temperatures in the low 60s to start accumulating chill hours. There are weather sites that will give information on climate (including mean temperatures) for any location in the country. For example, here is a chart for my area: http://www.intellicast.com/Local/USLocalStd.asp?loc=kslk&seg=LocalWeather&prodgrp=HistoricWeather&product=ClimateData&pid=none&prodnav 06
From there I see our mean temperature for April is 39 degrees. Plug in your own zip code and check your coldest months.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve wrote:

http://www.intellicast.com/Local/USLocalStd.asp?loc=kslk&seg=LocalWeather&prodgrp=HistoricWeather&product=ClimateData&pid=none&prodnav 06

Thank you Steve, so nice of you to try and help. I think it's a hopeless thing here. If we ever get a real wet year , maybe I will try one , anyway. I did try two pear trees last spring. They just gave up . Seems nothing does as well when we water things, as when God does. Hugs, Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

Well, good luck. We tried. :-) Enjoy your oranges, figs and all the other things that most of us can't grow, but you can.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kate, I did a little research. Go to your local state ag extension service on line, and find out the number of chilling hours in your area. If they don't give a list of fruits with their chilling hours, go here http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0053-F /
hope this helps. Pan Ohco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pan Ohco wrote:

I appreciate your help so much. I will book mark the site, too. We are not only in a drought here but the nights are still hugging 70 degrees. About ten degrees higher than normal for this year. I believe I will wait for a better time to venture into apples down here. Especially the gravensteins, that are my favorite ones. Thank you again for taking the time to check details and research for me. Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

Gosh, you sure can't say that people didn't try to help you with this one! I think we're going for the thread length record here. :-)
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Probably not Kate, it would be too hot for apples. just like here it is too cold to grow oranges and lemons (Nova Scotia). I guess we have to be grateful for what grows well in our areas and buy from other areas.
--
:) Lynn
"Kate" < snipped-for-privacy@granderiver.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lynn wrote:

Right you are . But people like me move to a different climate and right away try to grow things we have had our whole lives and mess up the humidity in the new area . Thank you kindly, for the come back, Lynn. hugs, Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi, Kate.
What about an avocado tree instead of an apple tree? They grow to approx. 30 feet high. There seems to be 2 different varieties of avocados and they seem to do very well in hot humid environments.
Also, if you're into smaller plants, belle peppers, jalapenos, serranos, and others could do pretty well for you.
What's it take to grow papayas and figs?
-- Jim Carlock Post replies to the newsgroup, thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Carlock wrote:

We have not been able to aquire the taste for avocados. They are a pretty tree. But don't really need just a tree. Thanks, though for the suggestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate, be adventurous. I sorely miss the figs growing in my parents' yard, but I came to admire the quality of Michigan apples. Maybe you can grow figs for me (and persimmons, and lemons).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
simy1 wrote:

Figs are a real treat for us. We hadn't seen them grow before planting three trees. They do great here. And produce at a very early stage. Surprised us. Persimmons , haven't tried either. I have two lemon trees though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kate wrote:

We grow Anna, Winter Banana, Beverly hills, Fuji in So. California
Search for low chill Apples. Apples for North Florida http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG368
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Kate, My references show Gravenstein growable in zones 2 to 9. Northern Texas is in zone 7, central zone 8, and southern zone 9. Seems like you should be able to grow this apple, unless you are at the very southern most tip of Texas which is in zone 10. I think it is worth a try.
Sherwin D.
Kate wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sherwindu wrote:

There's more to it than the hardiness zones. Hardiness zones go mostly by the coldest single day you have all winter. (they use some other factors to determine the zones) Hardiness zones are excellent for figuring out which plants will survive the winter and which may not. Hardiness zones are not good for figuring out chill hours. For example, zone 9b is what? 25 to 30 degrees? A location that reaches that temperature dozens of times would accumulate quite a few chill hours. Another location might only go that low once all year and be much warmer on the other days. It would still be zone 9b. The farther away from a large body of water the more likely there will be an occasional night much colder that normal to put you into a colder hardiness zone.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.