Another newbie with questions

Hello,
I'm new here. I went over to alt. home. lawn.garden, and there doesn't seem to be any activity there pertaining to gardening- just spam- so here I am. I am crossposting this between rec.gardens.edible and sci.agriculture.fruit
I thought I'd ask you for some pointers- since we moved from a condo to a home and have a "real" yard now- I started planting some stuff on Saturday.
I am excited about watching stuff grow. I went way over my budget- I got a peach tree, 4 hydrangeas, an azalea, a jasmine, 2 climbing roses, two blueberry plants and a raspberry and a blackberry.
1) On the package of the blueberries, it says to plant two different varieties near each other for cross-pollination. I didn't know what "variety" I had picked up so I went to another store and bought another, just hoping they are different. There didn't seem to be any variety marked on the label. I've heard they like acidity- what should I use on them that is safe for edibles?
2) Same with the raspberries. Do you think raspberries and blackberries pollinate each other? They look so much alike.
3) Since I can't find any Rainier or Queen Anne Cherry trees here (South Carolina), I saved some pits from last year. I put them in a big pot- shallow and about 20 inches in diameter- so they will grow some before I put them in the ground. Does that seem like a good thing? We have plenty of frost here in the winter which I think they need.
And- this may not be your expertise, but-)
4) I like blue hydrangeas, but if the soil is not acidic enough, they will bloom pink. I thought I'd leave two pink and 2 blue. Do you know what I would use as an acidifier ?
5) To the person here asking about peach trees- I just planted my first last week- it was bare- now it already had flowers! I'm amazed. We just came out of a very cold winter, and it is in the 70's here right now.
Thanks,
Karen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1. Blueberries; Yes two different cultivars helps. Also you mentioned South Carolina, unless you are very upstate, you will need either rabbiteyes (type) or southern highbush. The northern highbush just does not do much in the higher USDA zones. All blueberries need an acidic soil pH (5.5 -5.5) Most Georgia and South Carolina soils are naturally acid, but yours has probably been limed. Take a soil sample to you extension agent. The liquid iron sulfate (soil acidifier) sold at most nurseries is the quickest and easiest way to lower pH.
2. Raspberries and blackberries do not naturally cross, But raspberries do vector diseases that take out blackberries. Not a good idea to plant the close together.
3. Cherries are difficult in this part of the country. They are also very slow growing. It will be quite a few years before you find out what your seedlings will do.
4. The same iron sulfate as on the blueberries
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.