All my edible's are dying

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Why thanks! :-)
I was just trying to grow what I bought at the grocery store. I remove the outer covering from a head of garlic and set it in water until it starts to sprout, then separate the cloves and plant them. I always end up with a mild, onion-looking thing at the base...
And they never bloom.
I have a stand of wild onions and a HUGE patch of garlic chives that re-plant themselves every year! They do well.
--
Peace! Om

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First off, quit stripping the paper cover and pre-sprouting them. Just plant the individual bulbs. Don't break the clove up into bulbs until you're ready to plant. Use lots of compost. You're in Texas, so you're up to your eyeballs in bullshit down there -- shouldn't be hard to find some good composted cow manure. *smile*
Okay, now go read the stuff on Filaree, figure out which "types" will thrive in your climate, then go hit the Seed Savers site and see if they sell what you want. They're way cheaper than Filaree. (Not to diss Filaree, but in this economy, we have to be frugal if we aren't rich.) Seed Savers won't tell you if they're hardnecks, softnecks, etc., so get variety names from Filaree and look for them by name at Seed Savers.
Shipping from Filaree to you guys down there in the small states may be cheap(er). It's expensive as hell to get them to ship to me in Alaska, but I've done it and their stock is first rate.
Some types of garlic store well (mostly the softnecks that will grow well down south) and some won't. Some are great for braiding into those picturesque garlic braids, which sell like crazy for lots of money at Farmers Markets, if you're so inclined.
Different garlic varieties are like different wine varieties. Figure out which you like. Some are HOT. Some are mild with a long aftertaste. Some are great for roasting. You'll crack up when you read a real garlic nut's descriptions of the flavors.
Long live the stinking rose : )
Jan
PS: If you eat a lot of garlic all winter long, you won't get sick, because people with germs/colds/the flu won't get close enough to breath on you and share their germs. Works for me!
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Absolootly. Might be fun to try one of the elephant varieties if I can get them to grow.

It's expensive to ship anything to Alaska. Are you greenhousing up there? What about growing indoors?

Those are widely available south of the border for cheap. I had one for years by my front door, the cats finally tore it apart one day. Nearly every little shop in Nuevo Laredo has one by the door.

I work nights. That helps me avoid a lot of it since there are not nearly as many people. Good handwashing practices will remove a LOT of exposure to the cold virus. Did you know that the majority of flu' and cold viruses are passed hand to eye? I learned that in our annual infection control inservice. I work in health care. :-)
Thou shalt wash thy hands every time you come home from shopping! It's not paranoid to keep a container of hand disinfectant in the car and clean the steering wheel from time to time... Doorknobs and telephones at work get cleaned nightly.
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Peace! Om

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brevity snips

Keyboards are also filthy. I read somewhere they were as germy as the toilet seats in some office building that was tested.
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This is why those rubber "keyboard condoms" are such a good idea. Those can be washed in hot water and soap in a sink. We use them at work around the chemistry machines to keep accidental blood spills out of the keyboards.
Money is also one of the most germy things around. Too bad we stopped using silver for coinage. Silver has antibacterial activity.
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Peace! Om

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brevity snips
We normally get

Buy a canner like I just did. Start canning your own veggies as we will be doing from now on.
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Every Actual Alaskan(tm) owns a boiling bath canner and a pressure canner. I'm canning red (sockeye) salmon tonight. And we all have root cellars.
Jan
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Mom canned a batch of razor clams that we caught when we visited alaska. Mom was adept with a pressure cooker over a campfire. :-) She also canned the one large salmon dad caught.
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Peace! Om

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Good idea.
Or drying or freezing.
Alaska usually has plenty of ice. <g>
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Peace! Om

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I must be getting old, I know that.

I think it would help to have an Italian boyfriend;-)

I knew about garlic for B.P. but not yeast infections. Odd though, I would have thought that garlic and fungi would have gotten along, yhey do in my kitchen :o)

Did you know that a thyme flower decoction is anti-bacterial and used as a gargle is good for sore throats? Sorry, we weren't talking nose and throats, were we?

I've already ordered mine for this fall. I'm using the shot-gun approach. I'm planting several types in different spots on my north facing hillside.
Later and thanks for the catch.
Thanks to Jan too for the garlic website http://www.filareefarm.com /
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<snicker>
B.P.???
Heh! I refrigerate garlic in a basket in the 'frige. Onions are stored in a basket at room temp. Baskets are really good to keep stored veggies dry and slows mold growth.
I keep old easter baskets (the cheap ones) and just cut the handles off.

Sure! We are talking medicinal uses. :-) I have two different varieties of thyme in the herb garden so that's a good hint.
Right now, regular use of milk thistle capsules seems to be drastically shortening the length and severity of head colds! Seriously. I'm considering growing it since it does well in this climate.

Cheers! :-)

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Blood pressure.

We keep both in baskets and I have started planting those that sprout.

The lettuce garden has almost recovered from the raccoon who foraged in the mulch. I transplanted four valerians from their germination trays to larger pots. The potted passion fruit is four feet high and is starting to climb an oak tree. Tomorrow I'll transplant the skullcap baikal.
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Ah! Sorry. :-) Garlic is food for health in general.

IOW, you don't use it up that quickly either. <g> It's not expensive, I just prefer to use granulated garlic for most stuff. It agrees with me better.
Garlic will sprout in the 'frige too if left too long.

Neat! I have a passion vine too that is recovering from underwatering, and the Purple Cone Flower (Echinacea) has re-seeded itself now for 4 years in a row. Have not tried growing Valerian. I use the caps for a sleep aid sometimes.
I'd like to try growing hops one of these years, but do not know the requirement.
I also have a dead mimosa tree out front and am considering leaving the dead trunk in place and just removing the top, then "seeding" it with some kind of mushroom mycelia. Shitake would be my preference, but that's supposed to do best in Oak and I don't have any dead oak trees. I may just do Pearl Oyster since that's supposed to be one of the easiest to grow. I've managed to get it to fruit once in an unbleached toilet paper roll after innoculating the middle of the roll with some finely chopped stems. :-)
I should probably e-mail fungi perfecti for advice. Turkey Tail mushroom is supposed to have anti-viral and anti-cancer properties made into a tea.
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Peace! Om

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fungi perfecti ---> http://www.fungi.com/ I didn't know about them, thanks.

I thought you were a Kombucha fan. Still looking? What is your take on the effectiveness of Kombucha?
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They are an awesome company. I've read some of Stammet's books.

Dad is the Kombucha grower and fan. They are not really a true "mushroom". IMHO the brew just provides a lot of vitamins and minerals. Sort of a tonic. I'm not convinced it's a panacea, but ymmv. Many people swear by it as it gives them energy. I think it's the B-vitamins it contains. :-)
I'd rather take pills...
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Ps, altho' that does not stop me from researching nutritional values of specific foods. It was one of the reasons I got interested in mushrooms. Low in fat and calories, high in fiber and dense in nutrients. I was specifically looking for a vitamin D source last week that did not involve fish oil. Turns out that dried Shitakes are a VERY rich source and I normally have them in the pantry anyway, so I powdered up a bunch of caps again and have increased it's use as a food additive. It adds a nice flavor to poultry, soups, etc. They are NOT high in Vitamin A like many fish oils are which is a plus. It's easy to overdose on A which will kill your liver big time.
This from the FungiPerfecti website:
Nutritional Value of Mushrooms
"Many myths have been spread about mushrooms. One of the most inaccurate is that mushrooms have no nutritional value. To properly consider them for their nutritional benefits, they must be viewed from a dried weight perspective. And mushrooms give you maximum nutritional benefit only upon cooking. Mushrooms are relatively high in protein, averaging about 20% of their dried mass. Further they contribute a wide range of essential amino acids. Low in fat (between .3 and 2%) and high in fiber, mushrooms also provide several groups of vitamins, particularly thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, biotin, ascorbic acid and Vitamin D. For more information on the nutritional properties of mushrooms, Paul Stamets, founder of Fungi Perfecti, published an extensive study of 24 major nutrients in 16 mushroom species and varieties. See: Stamets, P., 2005. Notes on Nutritional Properties of Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms, International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, vol. 7: 103110."
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Don't know if you have the "17 year locusts" this year, but we do just southwest of you. I've got a new planting of over 600 blueberry plants that are mostly destroyed. The locusts cut the stems to create a pocket for their eggs. I've seen them cutting everything from goldenrod to white oak. Good Luck, Steve

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sometime in the recent past Anything_exotic posted this:

I have a small cold frame with some veggies in it. What I notice is that it has the appearance of high humidity, but the soil can still be relatively dry. As a result, it gets watered less than the outside garden.
Not a solution, just a suggestion.
Water - not enough and you're gonna die - too much and you're gonna die too! It's a balancing act.
Wilson
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'Wilson[_2_ Wrote:

Ok Ladies and Gent's Thanks for all your replys, I have notced recently that my greenhous is always soaking, so maybe a humidiy problem, how would I solve this? leave the door open all day? I recently wrapped bubble wrap around my greenhouse, (somebody said t stop direct rays burning leaves etc..) I dont know I am new to all thi
-- Anything_exotic
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OK, I don't run a greenhouse, but um, wrapping it in bubble wrap to prevent burning plants.. no.
There are things for you greenies that are called sunshade, what they look like is a huge sheet of screened netting. Comes in different weights to reduce different amounts of sun.
Take the bubble wrap off, it just ain't no good for ya. I don't see that that alone would cause all your grief, but it's a step in the right direction to put some sunshade over the greenhouse instead of it.
Cheers
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