acorn squash

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years ago we'd eat them and liked them, then the stores started carrying them with little flavor so we stopped buying them.
last year someone gave us a few acorn squash and we cleaned 'em out and cooked 'em up. not really all that good either, so i didn't think much of it and put the innards from the squish into the worm bins.
this spring planting i used the worm compost in the gardens as usual and we had some volunteer squash plants come up. most i will trim off so they don't disrupt the gardens, but a few here or there i let go as they can run into the pathways or along an edge. basically, it's free food of the sort we both like, so we are happy to have them.
this season a few of those were acorn squash and had fruits. hmmm... baked a few squash the other day (one acorn and a butternut). the inside looked like the acorn squash we used to get. actually yellow to orange colored instead of white and pasty. the flavor was excellent. whew! so it wasn't that they'd ruined the crop/seed line, but it was poor growing and harvesting too early. we cooked up another few squishes tonight and again were very happy with the acorn squash. didn't need to put a thing on them. i've saved those seeds to use again in the coming years.
i like it when a plan comes together, even when there really wasn't a plan at all...
songbird
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songbird wrote:

skip to :

Acorns are one of our favorites . To bad they weren't more productive this year , we only got four . Next year though ... we like them split and the seeds scraped out , then packed with brown sugar and a big pat of butter and baked . Also pretty good baked with the cavity filled with canned cranberries < not the jelly stuff , the berries> .
--
Snag
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Snag wrote: ...

i just split these and baked them (350F for 1hr) with a little water added to the pan.
i didn't add any thing else as they were already so sweet and tasty they didn't need a thing. i'm trying to avoid added sugars as much as i can these days (no specific health reason other than the fact that i feel a heck of a lot better).
ok, time to get to work... got a pile of apples to turn into apple sauce.
songbird
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On Saturday, November 2, 2013 9:54:09 AM UTC-4, songbird wrote:

Try them with your favorite stuffing. Grandma's chestnut stuffing is just great!
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songbird wrote:

serendipity
D
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

as my sister says, "We accept!" :)
i now have a nice pile of cleaned and dried seeds ready for next year.
songbird
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(snip)

I had had no idea what you meant by an 'acorn squash' so did a google and found out that its a winter squash http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn_squash so that (and the butternut) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butternut_squash is what we Australians would just put under the name of pumpkins.
Pumpkin is a staple foodstuff here in Oz and a very popular vegetable.
Pumpkin is very, very rarely served here in any sweet form except for Pumpkin Scones (and they have become somewhat of a joke)
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Farm1 wrote:

hmm, well i like scones, so i'm pretty sure i'd like them with pumpkin in them too... :)
in the USoA a common November/Thanksgiving/December/Christmas pie is pumpkin pie, which is a sweet custard with pumpkin and spices. i think that is where many of us get the idea that pumpkin and sweet go together. and probably the added fact that almost any food here in the states is now loaded with extra sugars/carbohydrates of one kind or another.
it is one of our favorite foods (pumpkin/squash).
as a very young kid (about 2yrs old) i was said to have climbed the cupboard drawers and sat on the counter and feasted on two pumpkin pies. alas, i have no memory of the event, but i do not doubt it as i'd probably still climb cupboards if i had to...
songbird
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The pumpkin in this case is what the French call "citrouille". In the U.S. it is basically a cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove delivery system.

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On Sunday, November 3, 2013 7:44:04 PM UTC-5, Farm1 wrote:


We're in Maryland, USA. My wife cooks pumpkins like squash, served as a veg etable at dinner. She also makes excellent pumpkin pies. We tried making cu stard in a pumpkin shell once; I liked it but she didn't think it was worth the effort, other than for the novelty of the presentation.
http://www.cooks.com/recipe/m92cx4xc/in-shell-pumpkin-custard.html
If we have a good pumpkin crop, we keep some to throw to the sheep as a tre at during the winter.
Paul
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Farm1 wrote:

Do they not grow Grammas in the south? I thought Gramma pie was a bush standard.
D
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wrote in message

Perhaps it once was. I haven't herd of anyone growing Gramma for years. I must see if I can find some seeds.
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Oh my, you be talkin' Strine now, aren't you?
Numero-uno: I doubt that any Bubba worth his salt would know what a Gramma pie was. It's just plain pumpkin pie in these parts.
Numero-two-o: By bush (not Bush) standard I presume that you mean common to unsophisticated rural areas. Au contraire, mon ami, Gramma pie is consumed in vast quantities during year end festivals by cognoscenti, bumpkins, urbanites, suburbanites, and all the other "ites" alike.
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Billy wrote:

A gramma is a cucurbit with orange flesh that is particularly made into a sweet(ish) pie and AFAIK not usually eaten as a vegetable. Whether you would call it a winter squash or a pumpkin I have no idea.

The 'bush' is everything outside cities and major regional centres and includes areas where your neighbours are a few hundred metres away and the outback where they might be a hundred kilometres away. It is where people tend to have land to grow large plants like pumpkins and the tradition of doing so. I wasn't making any comment on level of sophistication, it's that city folk wouldn't eat gramma pie due to the lack of grammas and knowing how to make it.
D
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wrote in message

:-)) Indeed. City people seem to have lost many skills when it comes to food and it's preparation.
I'm always stunned when I visit my sister in Sydney and look in her fridge and pantry. Both are almost bare and I always think of the old saying about 'society being 7 meals away from anarchy'. I could eat out of my fridge/freezer and pantry for at least a month but at my sisters I wonder what they will eat for dinner (she seldom does any cooking at all and they seem to eat out every night).
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Farm1 wrote:

I was reading that in some western cities (eg New York) kitchens are being converted to other uses (spare bedrooms, walk-in wardrobes etc) because the occupants always eat out and that some new appartments are built without one. No I can't recall when or who said so.
If you look at the way cities decay into anarchy in a few days due to external events (eg weather extremes such as Katrina at New Orleans) we must be very concerned about the fragility of such a way of life. As soon as the power or fuel stop people will be hungry very soon. We are going to pass through a transition away from a fossil fuel economy some time in the next generation. I don't see myself as a doomsayer but I worry that the transition will not be smooth. Many people would not be aware that in this country we have had many thousands of city men tramping about the bush looking for work/food. Sydney is now much bigger and more dependent on remote supplies of food and energy than it was in the Great Depression.
D
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I've read similar things for a few years. Being a keen and active cook, I shudder at the thought, let alone the practice.

Yep. Typhoon Haiyan being a current example.
We are going to pass

What astounds me is that such a fact is not glaringly obvious to so many people. We're living in post peak oil world by every account I've ever managed to read on the subject and despite Himself's hobby of collecting and driving old cars, we still try to be careful about our use of fuel and in our purchasing of oil derived products. And as you'd know, oil derived products are just about everything in and around a modern day house.
I don't see myself as a doomsayer but I worry that the > transition will not be smooth.
I know what you mean. I've read the Transitions Handbook and a lot of the other literature but it seems that many people have not or if they do think aobut the issues, they start to soudn like some of the radical 'preppers' cites aroudn the web.
More sane, middle class people need to start thinking aobut the issues and voting according to what they learn IMO. Additionally it wouldn't hurt if they started gardens and learned some of the old skills such as learngint or elaly cook not just assemble ingredients. I might someday come in handy.
Many people would not be aware that in this

When I was interested in the Depression, I was fascinated when I found out in my research that apparently Australia and Germany had the highest unemployment rates during the Depression years. I'd always thought the US was more impacted than anywhere else on earth but I guess the majority of all images we have ever seen about the Depression come from the US. The photographers they had in the US at that time were icons of B&W photgraphic 'art' and, even today, looking at their images still manages to say a lot about the human condition IMO.
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David Hare-Scott wrote: ...

i hope for a long and slow but steady decline in some aspects, but i have yet to see any civilization in historical records that just fades quietly.
the amount of debt and the various ways the current system is set up means that to unravel it will take quite a bit. to do it slowly, orderly and with restraint isn't in the lexicon of any society i've ever examined.
i'm not in the cities, but close enough that it is unlikely i would survive a diaspora event here. there's just too many of "them" and too few of "us".
songbird
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

sounds like Farm1 would call it a pumpkin.
around here grammas are people... some are sweet as pie.
songbird
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wrote in message

Nope. Just plain old English.
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