Acid for berries

Does anyone know a good way to acidify soil for blueberries *other than* aluminum sulfate? We're not much into eating aluminum. Is there anything natural? Could we use pine needles, and if so, how much?
Kathy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/05 8:11 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com, "Kathy"

I would not worry much about aluminum. Aluminum is the most common metallic element in the Earth's crust. It usually is in more insoluble form than aluminum sulfate. Anyway, I have not heard of using aluminum sulfate for acidifying soil. Gypsum, calcium sulfate, should do the job. Elemental sulfur should also do the job. If you are into natural, you cannot beat gypsum.
I eat aluminum (hydroxide) all the time as an antacid. It also helps reduce diarrhea.
Bill
-- Ferme le Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aluminum is not easily eliminated by the body and will build up to toxic levels... and has been linked to alzheimers.
If you want to relieve diarrhea, eat more cheese. For a good antacid, just Calcium carbonate. (tums or rolaids).
I take Xantac generic. That is a stomach acid reducer and is FAR superior to antacids.
Cheers!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/05 3:32 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "OmManiPadmeOmelet"

That is why it is constipating. It forms bricks before getting absorbed. The connection to Alzheimer disease was always tenuous and has now been refuted.

Limestone does indeed work well but produces some gas.

I was told by a hematologist that ranitidine was the reason for a low platelet count. I won't deny that ranitidine is effective.

-- Ferme le Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't count on it. ;-)

Never affected my platelet count and I run it monthly. There are advantages to being a lab tech, and the hematology section supervisor. <G> Mine runs around 290,000/mm3. Well in normal range. I take Ranitidine any time I have GR, generally 3 or 4 times per week.
Never ever have heard of it affecting plt count or any other hematological parameters. You could try Cimetidine if you are worried. It works reasonably well too but takes a slightly higher dose IMHO.
If you are running a low PLT count, there are a number of things that can do that. Alcohol, ITP, auto-immune disorders, AIDS, and other immune system problems, as well as chronic GI problems with chronic blood loss.

--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dilute vinegar? Just be careful with it!
Surely there are soil acidifiers that are NOT aluminum based at your local nursery???
Here we go! Sulfur! :-)
http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/components/1731-05 .html
Gotta love google. <G>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi All,
peat will asidify your soil, so will pine needles. You may need quite a lot and peat could be expensive in your part of the world. hope this helps you.
Richard M. Watkin.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/HO-65.pdf
John!
Kathy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fascinating! It says to use elemental sulfur. I'll have to track that down. Thanks!
Kathy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most welcome! :-) I got sulfur powder from my local nursery, "Gardenville". They sold it to me to correct a root fungal infection that was killing my Ivy.
Worked too!
I treated with sulfur first and watered it in, waited 2 weeks then treated with a soil flora powder supplement.
Cheers!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Aluminum Sulphate is the fastest, Sulfur works well. Pine straw, oak leaves will maintain a low pH , but take a lot of time if you have a high pH. If your pH is 6 or below, these mulches may be all you need. If you have a pH approaching 7, most likely there are alot of buffers in the soil whic will keep the pH high. If which case only shock treatments with acidifiers will work. Most local nurseries will sell something like Green Light Soil acidfier. It is in liquid form, mush easier to get apply accurately than powders.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had great results with Oak Leaves. Pile'em as high as you can and they will not only raise the acidity but improve the soil at the same time. Our yeilds have improved dramatically since the Old Guy next door turned us on to the practice.
Keith
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use pine needles as much as I can get from my neighbors; the needles are also good for cutting down the weeds.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.