working out running costs ?


Hi,
I was wondeirng if someone could tlel me how I would work out precisely how much electrcity\\money a heater costs to run over 6 hours, the heater I have says 22kw on it.
Just trying to figure out much money its costing me,.
Cheers
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GreasyFingers wrote:

Typically a heater will have a thermostat so that it won't be on continuously for hours at a time. So you can't just take the instantaneous consumption and assume it will be at that for the full 6 hours. So you have to use a measuring device to measure the actual consumption(eg buy an electric meter off ebay and wire it into a mains extension lead).
If your heater really is 22kW and really is running constantly, it will use 22 units an hour, or 6x22 units in 6 hours. You can find out the cost of a unit from your lecky bill.
If, more likely, it is 2.2kW and is only on half the time, it will use 2.2x3 units.
The meter will show you the actual number of units used - just subtract the reading at the start from the reading at the end.
--
Sue




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Thats the one I missed out the dot :)

is there mathmatical way of working out out without a mieter from ebay ?
Thanks for the help here :)
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GreasyFingers wrote:

You could get an estimate from your house meter:
day 1 read the meter at the beginning and end of the 6 hour period, with the heater off and not switching anything on or off in the house during those 6 hours. Say the difference is 12 - the baseline consumption.
day 2 read the meter at the beginning and end of the 6 hour period, with the heater on and again not switching anything on or off in the house during those 6 hours. Say the difference is 18. Now subtract the baseline figure (eg the 12 above). That gives the number of units used by the heater over the 6 hour period. In this case 6 units.
--
Sue




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rather well. Even though it is from the USA.
HTH
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2007 19:59:40 -0000, "GreasyFingers"

22kw @ 012 per unit = 2.64 per hour to run.
What sort of heater is it? It sounds like you are smelting aluminium or gold!
(0.12 is an example figure)
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wrote:

Its on of those covester type heaters.
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The word 'Precisely' throws a spanner in the works here . In order to be precise you will need to monitor both the current and the voltage at the heater, know the exact cost your supplier is charging per killowatt hour plus any meter rental charge, and ensure the room temperature at the start of the test period is always the same etc. etc. etc.
If you just want to get a rough idea , as has already been said in this group , do the following.
Check your utility bill for the cost per UNIT (killowatt hour) This can be a dual rate (so much for first xxx units then so much for rest.)
Also if you have off peak metering this again is a different rate.
Finally take this figure and multiply it by 13.2 (2.2 x 6 = 13.2 )
As most convectors are left on full by the user and the room they are in is usually drafty most thermostatic units don't turn off due to heat loss but if you have a small room and the heater warms it quickly you will need to time how long it is on during the period.
The question is will all this effort be worth it; even if the heater is on for 6 hours and you are paying way over the odds for electricity (average 7p - 8p per unit) it will only cost you 1.32p at 10p per unit for 6 hours
Good luck CJ
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