Wooden floor over heating pipe


I have a room around 24 x 11 feet. Half of the floor is conventional floor boards over 4 x 2 inch joists (1930's). The other half is an extension and is a concrete slab (1980's). The slab has two central heating copper pipes (15mm) running through it to supply a radiator. The copper pipe had no insulation and was embedded directly in the concrete.
I have removed the pipes as I want to insulate them. I would also like to install a wooden floor in this room (either solid or engineered wood). Does anyone know how much, and what type of, insulation needs to be put on the heating pipe? I am worried about it damaging the floor.
Brian
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Brian wrote:

on pipe insulation (the stuff that is tubular with a split along it). That ought to cut down most of the heat loss.
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Malc
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Malc
Thanks for the advice.
The floor is not yet in place and the old pipes have been removed. They were buried directly in the slab!
I have tried the 9mm wall thickness Armaflex tubular insulation and this gave a surface temp of 45 deg C. The 19mm wall thickness gave a surface temp of 29 deg C. Temperature was measured with two thermocouples, one at the pipe surface (under the armaflex) and the other at the surface of the armaflex measured by placing the thermocouple under another thin piece of armaflex. This may have given an exagerated value.
The thicker insulation clearly gives a lower surface temperature but it means cutting a 60mm deep chase across the slab. I have no idae how deep the slab is and how far down the damp membrane is so I am trying to minimise the chase depth but without risking damaging teh new floor.
Brian

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