Why are fluorescent lights so much better than incandescent lights?


I have heard that changing lights in you house can save a lot of money.. is this true?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Parry wrote:

Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Boy have you opened a can of worms!
Think I'll just sit back and watch...............
--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's probably true if you only look at the cost of the electricity consumed. Incandescent bulbs work by heating the filament to a high temperature, at which point it glows very brightly and gives out light. Fluorescent bulbs work by exciting the atoms of either a gas contained within a tube or the coating inside it by passing a current through the gas in the tube. When the atoms are excited they give off light. The current required to excite them is very much less than that required to produce the same light output from an incandescent bulb.
However, the cost of the electricity takes no account of the price of the bulb and how long it will last compared to the other type. I believe fluorescent bulbs last much longer than incandescent, but cost several times more. Those who promote fluorescent bulbs reckon they are cheaper overall in the long run. However, I also understand that the cost of production (particularly in green terms) and the cost of disposal (also in green terms) can outweigh this. Politicians and the EU say fluorescent bulbs are better (without necessarily defining 'better'). This leads me to feel that the reverse is true.
Rob Graham
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c9/page_58.shtml
On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 16:34:30 -0700 (PDT), Frank Parry

===================================== Please always reply to news group as the email address in this post's header does not exist. Alternatively, use one of the contact addresses at:     http://www.macfh.co.uk/JavaJive/JavaJive.html     http://www.macfh.co.uk/Macfarlane/Macfarlane.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Java Jive" wrote:

I agree, but to attempt to predict cost savings for 12 years when the price of bulbs and electricity is likely to change considerably seems to be a bit optimistic! If prices were going to remain stable it would be possible to calculate the breakeven point followed by the cost savings.
My advice is to change as many bulbs as possible to fluorescents but to keep the old incandescents because if you have a power cut with reduced voltage the fluorescents won't work but the incandescent will, albeit with a reduced light output.
I wonder when they are going to get around to looking at the really high electricity consuming devices such as the motors in washing machines and tumble driers, and the heating elements in those appliances and others such as immersion heaters, ovens, grills and dishwashers. And what about air conditioning?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.