What are acceptable repairs to foundations?

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The inspector was down today, he checked over the footings and didn't seem too unhappy. Unfortunately the holes I dug for him to inspect the footing seem to be on clay near the house. His suggestion as a fix if the clay goes any deeper, is to tie a lintel into the house foundations and sit it on the footings further down. This would tie the porch into the existing footings. So I guess you're right, lintels can be used in conjunction with existing footings. Assuming the lintel is up to spec as are the footings.
I must admit, I'm not sure how much I like this idea. If the front of the porch starts to settle it's going to have a significant upwards thrust on the column the lintel will be tied into.
But I've dug down another foot and seem to go through the clay layer. So hopefully no work with have to be done to the main building.
Not only that, but as I've dug another foot down (must be 100-120cm under ground now), I've exposed some rubber trunking. I can't make out what it is, all I can feel and see (before the hole fill up with water and sand) is that it's rectangular and about 5cm wide, but 15cm deep, at a bit of a strange angle. Fingers crossed it's just rubbish thrown into the hole.
What a faff.
Tim
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 20:46:05 +0000, Tim wrote:

=================================Since the inspector has effectively endorsed the use of a lintel I would suggest that you get your builder to tell you exactly how he intends to implement the job since the suggestion came from him originally. Personally I wouldn't want to risk any disturbance to the house footings by tying in new to old for something as minor as a porch.
It would be sensible to get a written statement / description from the builder to ensure that he accepts responsibility for the modifications made necessary by his error. Photographs would be a sensible precaution, although I doubt if there's any serious risk of things going wrong if the lintel is properly installed. I would ask your builder about my suggestion of a possible pier + block foundation at the mid point of the lintel since it appears that the lintel will need to be about 2.8 metres in length.
As far as the rubber trunking is concerned, I have no idea what it could be but you could try tracing it in a narrow trench until you find what it is - better to be safe than sorry.
Cic.
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In all honesty, I really don't want to tamper with the existing footings. I'd have to give very serious consideration to even having the porch built if that was the case. Either that or reduce the porch to a much smaller storm shelter type thing or UPVC conservatory.
Fingers crossed.
Tim
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Tim wrote:

I contacted the building inspectors just for some advise and have found that the porch does require building regs after all. So it will get a full inspection and rectification work carried out accordingly. I'll post here (as a new thread) what the building inspector came back with and the actual work done.
But from what I was explaining over the phone, he said it will require either dowels (not sure if I've spelled that right), to bind the two footings. Or as an alternative, dig another trench to the correct depth by the existing footings and do another pour to 15cm above the existing footing. I've had to dig an inspection trench for the inspector, the concrete down there is between 20-30cm deep (mostly 30cm). Shame it's just too far off centre to use.
I guess the cost of a load of concrete will probably determine the solution they go for. I guess it would probably be about 600l.
Regards,
Tim
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