Sound Proofing


Party wall with next door is quite thin and easily transmits sound - what is the most cost effective way to sound proof a wall either side of the chimney breast that looks good, and where would I get the necessary materials?
Many thanks
Alan
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I would think that 2" studding with Rockwool in between and plasterboarded over would be pretty effective.
Rob Graham
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On Sat, 3 Dec 2005 08:21:14 +0000 (UTC), a particular chimpanzee named
and produced:

Unfortunately, you'd be wrong. At best, it may give a very marginal improvement, but probably not noticeable.
Sound travels through a party wall in a number of ways. First is any airborne paths, such as any gaps around floor joists built in to a party wall. In addition, some older houses had no separating wall in the roof space, or it didn't extend full height to the ridge. Second is flanking transmission, where vibrations in floors or internal walls reverberate through the structure to the party wall, and from there into your internal walls and floors. Third is direct transmission through the wall.
You don't say what kind of noise it is (low frequency bass notes, mid-high frequency noise such as talking, etc), nor what kind of building it is (solid walled Victorian, cavity walled 1920's-1960's, lightweight block 1960's-1990's, etc). Is the noise worse in one room only? Without this knowledge it's difficult to offer any solution.
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1960's bungalow - and mainly the noise is sound of TV and dog barking
Alan

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On Sat, 3 Dec 2005 10:08:00 +0000 (UTC), a particular chimpanzee named
keyboard and produced:

Unless your neighbours have their TV on loud or it's an exceptionally loud dog, you shouldn't normally be able to hear these noises through a party wall. Check all the possible air paths between the buildings, ie., in the sub floor void, in the loft, where joists are built into the party wall, and seal them.
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My gran had a similar problem with a 1970's bungalow, TV and general conversation was as if it was in the same room. She had some "soundproofing wallpaper" fitted and then papered over in the traditional manner. The noise is more muffled and specific words are not clear but it is still possible to hear voices through the concrete block wall.
randomly hit the

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I remember reading about some sort of electrical device that would 'bounce' the sound back .Dont know much about it though.
I had the same problem as you a few years ago,a semi detached and slightly noisy neighbours but I have gone stone deaf in one ear so I don't hear much from next door now.Not recommended as a solution!!!!
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