Septic Tank & Cottage with 0.1 Acres - Percolation Area etc...

I've noticed a small cottage for sale which has a total site area of 0.1 acres. It has a septic tank, and apparently there are no mains sewerage services in the area, though there is mains water.
Unfortunately the septic tank is located on someone elses land as the site is quite small. The land on which the septic tank is located is not for sale. Though there is a right of way in order to access the septic tank.
I was just wondering if anyone here had any opinions about this?
Obviously it's not great having the septic tank located on someone elses land. As the site belonging to the cottage is just 0.1 cares I don't think this would be large to accomodate a septic tank and the percolation area so it looks as if it would have to remain on the other persons field.
Unless anyone here knows of any septic tanks that don't require large percolation areas...or if anyone has any other ideas...? Thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com wrote:

http://www.whirlnet.co.uk/demon/septic.txt
IME, it is very common to have tanks on other people's land.
Typically the local farmer/landowner had several cottages for his employees. At the time, where the tank went was not a problem, it was all his land - but now a lot of farms/estates don't have anything like that number of employees, so have sold the cottages with the smallest bit of land around them that the planning authority would allow..
So, I wouldn't worry too much.
You can get /cess pits/ that can be buried in a very small garden. It really depends on the geology - a big hole like that can be very expensive if you have solid rock not far under the topsoil.
The main advantage is you have to be far less careful with a cess pit as to what goes into it. They are far less bother - but you do have the expense of the frequent emptying if you have a big family. You don't have to be there - they just come and empty it at fixed intervals and invoice you. If you mis-manage a septic tank, it can be a nightmare..
--
Sue




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Palindr☻me wrote:

Phil L wrote:

Thanks
I was wondering, even if there is a formal right of way which has been proven and verified by a solicitor, is it still possible that the owner of the land on which the septic tank is situated could in the future legally require the owner of the septic tank to remove the septic tank from his land?
What I mean is, even if there is a legal right of way to the septic tank whilst it is located in the other persons field, could they legally require it to be removed and therefore leaving the cottage without a septic tank?
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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com wrote:

Sort of leave you with a right of way across the land to where the tank used to be?
If that was a big risk, a whole load of cottages down here would be unsaleable..
It is obviously something for the solicitor and hopefully you have one who is used to rural properties. He may suggest a one-off premium for an insurance poicy to cover such an eventuality.
I, personally, would be far more worried about poisoning the thing. (Tank, not neighbour). It's ok if you were brought up with one but even then you have to be so careful about what you, your kids and your visitors pour down the washbasin or the loo. Discussing with your son's visiting girlfriend what she washes her knickers in, for example..
It's like looking after a baby, but at least they grow up and leave home, eventually.
Me, if I wanted to be a sewerage engineer, I'd have got a job with the council.
--
Sue












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What happens if you "poison" a septic tank?
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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com wrote:

Raw sewage and especially solids build up in the primary tank until they enter the secondary tank and drainfield.
The smell starts then. It gets worse.
The solids block the porous pipes or gravel drainfield connected to the secondary tank so the secondary tank continues to fill. Eventually this prevents the primary tank from discharging.
The secondary tank fills until the level rises to the air vents and forms a liquid lock.
The primary tank fills and backs up into the house...
Gas builds up in the primary and secondary tank - causing a pressure rise and raw sewage to be pushed through the ubends in the house, into the sink, bath, toilet, etc...
It only costs a few hundred to fix - unless the whole drainfield has to be dug up and replaced.
--

Sue








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Crikey...so what poisons septic tanks...?
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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com wrote:

tank". Or "seeding your septic tank".
If the tank is a bit poorly, a very little can finish it off. It is basically a living system, after all. Water softeners, bleach, detergent, oil, hair shampoo, mouthwash, Dettol, nappisan, carpet shampoo, swarfega, the list goes on and on.
Regular, but not too regular, opening up of the chambers to check for problems, such as the wrong levels, foaming, green mould, depth of sludge, etc is a vital part of owning a healthy tank..
--
Sue





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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com wrote:

Bleach, Dettol, any antiseptic, basically anything that kills the microbes that actually "digest" the sewage.
--
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I think you have the outline for a horror movie there. It works quite well if you read it with the Jaws music in the background...
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