scribed skirting...


Hi all
Fitting skirting boards today, scribing the external joints, could anyone tell me what the best tool is for cutting the profile of the skirting?
Many Thanks
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Paul Dale wrote:

Is it taurus skirting?
A Mitre saw or Mitre block. If you're buying one of these make sure you select the right depth of cut type.
ie you cant cut a 6" skirting on a 5" depth of cut mitre saw.
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 35557&ts167
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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======================A coping saw for cutting scribed joints BUT mitred joints are much easier:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 35552&ts617
Coping saws are readily available from Wicks, B&Q etc.
Cic.
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Cicero wrote:

But no good for external cuts,unless you're good at cutting straight lines. :-)
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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An external joint would not normally be scribed, internal ones yes but external are mitred.
HTH
John
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John wrote:

Apologies for being dull but whats the difference between scribing and mitreing ?
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A mitred joint is done by cutting the ends of two pieces of skirting (or other timber) at 45 degrees. When the two pieces are brought together they will form a 90 degree angle (45 + 45). Depending on how you cut the ends you can create either an internal or external 90 degree corner. If the corner isn't an accurate 90 degrees you can vary the cuts to suit by dividing the actual angle by 2 and cut to that size.
To prepare a scribed joint first cut one piece of skirting at 90 degrees. An offcut will do for this as it's only used as a pattern. Place this offcut / pattern at 90 degrees to a length of skirting close to one end. Trace the outline of the offcut onto the skirting .Use either a pencil, bradawl or metal scriber to do the tracing. Now cut along the scribed line (using a coping saw) and you'll have a profile of the skirting. Fix one piece of skirting with a plain end and then bring the newly cut profiled piece up to the first and you'll have a near perfect joint.
Cic.
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For pictures see here
http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/WOODWORKINGSKIRTING_BOARD.htm
HTH
John
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