Safely discharging a capacitor

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On 21 Dec,

They tangle then untangle the washing. Our first one did that, Our current one only goes one way, It's much less efficient, and is more work separating at the end.
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James Sweet wrote:

To stop the clothes getting tangled, also the stopping then going the other way will help stop areas of stagnation (and hence slow drying) occuring. Mine a "Tricity Bendix TM 220 W" certainly has this drum reversing indeed it is sold as a feature of this model and is called "reverse action".
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soup wrote:

Well damn, I cleaned up and tested out the Creda dryer which is the mate for the washer I've been refurbishing and it does in fact reverse the drum periodically. Nifty little machine, not like anything I've used before. If the washer was a bit larger capacity and I didn't have a big Neptune front loader already I'd definitely keep this pair but a friend of mine has more of a need for them than I do.
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According to my Electrical Engineering professor at university *all* electrical machines (including transoformers) are really induction motors.
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Motors with squirrel-cage rotors can be used on single-phase alternating current by means of various arrangements of inductance and capacitance that alter the characteristics of the single-phase voltage and make it resemble a two-phase voltage. Such motors are called split-phase motors or condenser motors (or capacitor motors), depending on the arrangement used. Single-phase squirrel-cage motors do not have a large starting torque, and for applications where such torque is required, repulsion-induction motors are used. A repulsion-induction motor may be of the split-phase or condenser type, but has a manual or automatic switch that allows current to flow between brushes on the commutator when the motor is starting, and short-circuits all commutator segments after the motor reaches a critical speed. Repulsion-induction motors are so named because their starting torque depends on the repulsion between the rotor and the stator, and their torque while running depends on induction. Series-wound motors with commutators, which will operate on direct or alternating current, are called universal motors. They are usually made only in small sizes and are commonly used in household appliances.
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wrote:

Stick a big screwdriver across it. This is bad advice for capacitors in general, but for these motor capacitors used on 240V AC only it's OK. There is minimal likelihood of there being any charge left in there, you're only shorting it to make _sure_ before you touch it by hand. If it _had_ been charged up by the Workshop Pixies beforehand, then it just costs you a screwdriver and a pair of trousers.
If you're fooling with HT DC on capacitors, then fit proper bleed resistors before you start and make yourself a discharging stick with a resistor in it.
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It depends what's across it,
stick a screwdriver across it - that'll discharge it
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