round sink moves around

My husband and I did all our own DIY jobs I learned a lot.I am 76 and on my own now,I got a plumber to to do the sink when getting new kitchen 4 years ago,what I need to know is although the sink moves around and there seems to be a grey foam stuff or sealant beneath,how can I reseal the basin so it it water tight and wont move,I have sylicone sealant and gun,am wary on removing the grey stuff in case I dont put enough under or too much,Utube video was much help and I was able to change tap washers no problem and put a new cartridge in my shower.Can anyone help please,much obliged Vi.
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On 11/14/11 3:49 AM, itsnaeme wrote:

job, securing the sink and sealing it. So I would remove and replace all of it.
First, either buy a sealant that is made for sinks or get the hardware store people to confirm that the sealant you already have is good for that purpose.
If your hot water and cold water are connected through the basin itself instead of through the counter top beside the basin, disconnect them.
Disconnect the drain line or disposer where it connects to the sink.
Mark the counter top with masking tape placed within 1/4 inch of the sink edge so that when you have the sink removed you will be able to see where the edge was and will know exactly where to put the new sealant.
Lift the basin either all the way out or at least far enough to allow you to scrap away all of the grey form. Clean the under side of the sink edge and the counter top where the sink will fit.
Spread the sealant generously on the counter top. Make it reach a little further than where the sink edge will be.
Lower the sink straight down onto the sealant. Do it as accurately as possible so that it won't be necessary to adjust the position when it is down.
If the sink has an anchoring mechanism, reconnect it.
Remove the excess sealant carefully. I use my finger because that leaves a rounded concave bead. The alternative is a plastic tool with edges of differing profiles. The advantages are that you get to choose which profile you want and the profile will be uniform.
Don't reconnect the drain or water lines until the sealant is fully cured. With some sealants, that takes 24 hours. Some take longer. It is best to leave it undisturbed for an extra day or two, beyond what the directions say.
McGyver
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On 14/11/2011 16:51, McGyver wrote:

counter top so would I be right in that it will not be touched.I put my fingers under the sink and I could lift it about 1/2"and see my fingers and it certainly looks a dark grey rubber seal like a huge washer thing,I have masking tape and will get some sealant at the weekend when in town.What I have which fell off years ago is some kind of bracket with an adjustable screw,that came off the drainer side there is one under the sink itself I tightened the screw though dont know what its there for,its not as though there is a lip under the sink to attach it too,also as its a pretty flat stainless sink rim I think the sealant will have to be right up to the inner edge as it slightly slopes down,maybe that was why its dark grey as its a black marble top,and if the sealent is white even after cleaning it might show,I dont know if I am making myself clear,if not I can take a photo and send.,thanks for taking the trouble to help me,I take on board what you are telling me what to do. Vi
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On 11/14/11 9:43 AM, itsnaeme wrote:

Right - anything that goes through the counter top rather than through the sink won't need to be disconnected.
If the dark grey thing is a single piece like a gasket, maybe you can replace it. You called it foam, so I assumed it was not a contiguous piece. Replacing the gasket would create an excellent seal if you use sealant in addition. Use the sealant to glue the gasket down to the counter and put more sealant on top of the gasket to glue the sink to the gasket.
I had a sink once with mounting brackets connecting to nothing, because it was made for connecting to a counter of a different design. It may be that at one time your sink and counter matched each other regarding the brackets connecting the sink to the counter and then later, either the sink or the counter was replaced and they no longer matched. That's harmless if you use the sealant to glue the sink in place.
I don't know what you meant by: "also as its a pretty flat stainless sink rim I think the sealant will have to be right up to the inner edge as it slightly slopes down,maybe that was why its dark grey as its a black marble top,and if the sealent is white even after cleaning it might show." If you can clarify the question for me, I'll try to answer. I don't know if a photo will help but if you think it will clarify the questions, a photo would be a good idea. You can email the picture and the question to me or you can upload the picture to Photobucket or wherever and post a link, and them post your questions here.
McGyver Greyprof @ hotmail . com (remove the spaces)
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On 14/11/2011 18:20, McGyver wrote:

,tomorrow I will take a snap and post the link,I have a good idea how to go about it now you have explained
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