Roff ventilator tile leaking?


Hi,
I have a 6 year old semi-bungalow with a steeply pitched roof clad with concrete tiles.
The kitchen extractor flexible pipe runs up into the roof space, and protrudes through the roof tiles, terminated by a concrete tile cover.
During the first couple of years of ownership from new we noticed that during moderate/heavy rain, water was entering the vent pip and dripping down through the cooker hood.
The builders supposedly rectified the problem.
After changing the cheap 'n' nasty cooker hood for a stainless steel 'range' hood we found that the builder's solution to the leak was simply to introduce a angle to the vent pipe which allowed water to collect inside the pipe, but prevented it from entering the cooker hood.
I need to resolve the problem. It is not condensation - moderate rain produces a steady trickle of water that is definitely running down the interior of the vent pipe. Thus, it must somehow be entering the pipe in spite of the roof ventilator tile (which covers the assembly)
I have no experience of roof tiles (and was hoping to die before gaining any!) but I must now investigate why the tile (which appears to be adequately covering the rigid plastic pipe that protrudes through the roof) is admitting water.
I have yet to examine the pipe from inside the roof space (a joy reserved for tomorrow via a 1 metre wide crawl spece that runs at the edge of the roof). On the exterior, I have cleared leaves and debris from inside the vent tile, so there is no build up of rain water that might overflow into the vent pipe.
Google is sparse on instructions for fitting vent tiles - but there are some references to 'traps' that channel excess water back out onto the roof - I don't know whether this is fitted in my case.
I would appreciate any suggestions for
a/ the likely cause of the leak
b/ how to remove the vent tile without breaking it ( seems to be held by some sort of flat spring)
c/ any other thoughts for rectifying this issue
many thanks
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Sick of DIY wrote:

Ingenious!
Mike
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"Sick of DIY" wrote:

It is possible that the pitch is too steep for that particular vent, or the vent is faulty or is not positioned correctly.

I have no idea. I would try to work out the direction of tension of the spring, how it is holding the vent in place, and how the tension could be reduced in order to remove the vent.

I would visit some roofing firms, ask to see roof vents, explain the problem, show them a photo or drawing of the existing vent, and see what they advise and recommend. If I thought it was within my diy skills I would buy a new vent and fit it. Otherwise I would ask them for estimates for removal of the existing vent and supply/fixing of a new vent.
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Codswallop wrote:

Pah, why bother, do as the pros do, just put a bugger bend in the pipe, better still add a drain to the bend and solve the problem completely!
Mike
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and under the under lap of the tile next to it on the right. Just pull it down.
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Thanks to all who replied to my anguished cry about the leaking vent tile.
I was fortunate enough to find a semi-retired roofer, who turned up with his roof ladder and whipped off the tile for inspection. The silicone bedding around the pipe (where it passes through the tile) was bad, so he resealed it - and replaced a strip of roof felt that the builders had hacked to pieces while installing the vent.
I've yet to test it (wanted to allow time for the silicone to set) but rain is forecast, so I'll soon know (or I'll get the hose out)
The cost for turning up, removing several tiles, replacing felt, and resealing the vent tile?........30 (it pays to look poor and harassed...)
What amazed me was the speed in which the tiles were removed - I can remember Sunday School lessons about a sick man who was lowered down to Jesus through a crowded house, after his friends hit on the ingenious ploy of making a hole in the roof. Watching the roofer speedily remove the tiles and cut the battens, I couldn't help wondering why modern-day bungalow burglars don't by-pass all the inconvenience of alarms and multi-point locks by simply ripping off a few tiles and entering the roof void!
It would take them no time at all! - makes me wonder why I even bother locking the front door.
Anyway - thanks again for your input.
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It is because people do not lock their front doors and also leave keys insight that can be hooked through the letterbox that there are so many thefts. When burgulars have to start bringing ladders to do a job then worry about your roof.
Adam
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For most bungalows the scrotes wouldn't require a ladder - particularly as they are all remarkably spry and agile. Any oung tea-leaf worthy of his DVD recorder could be on the roof and into the loft before you could say, "where's my insurance policy?"
Anyway, on a brighter note, we had rain here yesterday that was unknown since the days of Noah - and the 30 vent tile repair repelled every drop, much to my delight.
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