Radiator problems


The radiator in our bathroom constantly needs bleeding. In comparison to the other radiators it looks relatively new and has standard valves.
All other rads are fine but we keep getting air in this one. Any idea what could be causing it and a solution?
Paul
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what
air. If the system has been refilled within the last year it may just be air dissolved in the water coming out. Hopefully it will cease eventually. Ensure that the pump is off when you bleed otherwise you may draw air into the system. TonyB
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Thanks Tony,
I think it probably is the highest one on the system (along with the bedroom one). We haven't re-filled the system in the last year (unless removing a downstairs rad for decorating counts?).

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==============Do a quick check on all the valve nuts - one might be drawing in a little air. Test each to see if they need a slight 'nipping up'.
Cic.
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This one keeps on cropping up. There's no way that any loose nut etc should draw air in. Anything loose usually leaks.Well that's been my experience. Anyway, is it the nearest one to the boiler? That's usually the one that gets the air. Most importantly though it seems as if the system could be drawing in air. I replied to a post a couple of weeks ago explaining this. The feed and expansion pipes should be fitted such that when the system is running there is virtually no pressure difference between the two. If there is, you could either get water pumping over if it has positive pressure or sucking air in if it has negative pressure. You could try slowing the pump down to its slowest setting. This often fixes the problem. If not you should get it sorted as air in the sytem will corrode it much faster than having no air. Actually, with no air it should last forever within reason. Its the oxygen in the air that causes the black rust you often see in central heating systems. There is a device available which traps air and sends it up the vent pipe but the feed is also connected to it which ensures there is no pressure differential between the feed and expansion. Have a look at: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 0126&ts441&id641
BTW, You say it looks fairly new. Could this be that the problem has been around for a while and this radiator has corroded to the point where it started to leak and so a new one had to be fitted. Just a thought.

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<snip>
==================A loose nut can let air in and the degree of looseness may mean that there is a barely perceptible weeping which may evaporate alsmost as soon as it appears.
A quick check on these nuts is certainly worthwhile if only as part of a general search for the source of air intake.
Cic.
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http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/plumbing/plumbingpage1.html#corrosion
Adam
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Actually, leaks in heating systems, even when the water is under pressure, will still suck in air. For a more detailed description, read http://groups.google.com/group/uk.d-i-y/msg/0fe52b674cf9ad5c?hl=en &
A vented system could be sucking air in through the expansion pipe. OP hasn't said if system is sealed or vented.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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