Plumbing-Flexible Hoses


I am in the process of refitting my ensuite bathroom and would like to make the final water feed connection to my toilet via a flexible hose. A quick measure of the plastic inlet thread and the dia looks to be about 3/4" but I don't know the pitch. Question is whether a 3/4" flexible tap connector would be compatible?
TIA
Ian
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It will almost definately be a 1/2" thread. The 1/2" (or 3/4") refers to the internal bore of the pipe. I have yet to see a toilet inlet with a 3/4" fitting. If you haven't got one, then I suggest fitting an inline service valve or use a flexible tap connector with an integral one.
HTH
John
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John wrote:

'Wot he said. I didn't fit service valves initially but got so fed up that I spent a day fitting them to everything. Now, anything as minor as changing a washer or as major as changing the bathroom suite is so much easier.
I wouldn't use flexible hoses anywhere I couldn't get to them easily. I find it difficult to believe that they will be as long-lived or trouble free as a solid bit of pipe..
--
Sue

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Sue, I agree that they probably won't be as long lived or trouble free as solid copper but they do allow a degree of positioning and make life easier for DIY. What I haven't used yet are pushfit connectors. I just can't get my head around trusting them!!!
Thanks Ian
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IED wrote:

ring of silver that appears, like magic, around the top of a soldered joint very reassuring.
I certainly would use push-fit, if time mattered. In many ways they look a much better idea than normal compression fittings. But they are manufactured to, and rely on, very tight tolerances - so I would only use them with new pipework that I was positive met the spec.
All a bit of a change from wiping joints on lead pipes and making your own joints, not using pre-formed ones..
--
Sue





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wrote:

You can do wiped soldering?
RESPECT!!!!
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May seem a silly question but what is wiped soldering?
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very nice oval joint of lead.
It is made by working solder with a cloth.
The highest solder work going
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IED wrote:

Basically involving a cast iron pot of molten lead boiling away, a lot of wierd shaped hammers and other strange tools, asbestos rags and total absence of Health and Safety Rules.
A certain amount of skill is needed - otherwise the joint ending up encased in lead tend to be the subtalar.
--
Sue






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> It will almost definately be a 1/2" thread. The 1/2" (or 3/4") refers to the

Thanks John, I didn't realise that the measurement referred to the inside bore!!! Haven't actually purchased the toilet yet I just put a rule across the O/D of another toilet inlet. WRT the inline service valve, I agree, and always fit an isolator whenever I can.
Another couple of plumbing related questions, I have some chrome plated copper piping that is going to feed my towel radiator;
Any issues with compression fittings?
For soldering, I assume I have to remove the chrome. What is the best method?
TIA
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SNIP

and 1" And the threads incidentally are BSP (British Standard Pipe) This was a good system because whether your pipes were iron, lead or copper, the internal size and therefore the amount of fluid that would pass through them was the same irrespective of the wall thickness of the pipe. Now the metric sizes refer to outside diameter of the pipe, which is ok-ish, for copper at least. 1/2" is now 15mm, 3/4" is 22mm, and 1" is 28mm, but as every body knows, there are 25.4mm to the inch, not 28. I don't know what's happened with iron pipe sizes, I don't use it.

Make certain it is plated copper, and not stainless, which can be thin-walled. This is where push-fit becomes a bit iffy. Don't ask how I know :-((

I wouldn't. I'd just use a new olive, with PTFE tape if necessary.
Steve
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Steve, thanks for the clarification and for the tip about ensuring it is plated copper. Have checked and it is.
Ian
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They are fine for use with chrome plated copper pipe.

You have to remove the chrome for pushfit as well.
Use compression on chrome
Adam
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Said it before, .....say it again,.......palindr's a diy godess :-)

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