Plug chain stuck in sink overflow


The girlfriend's 4 year old monster/son has broken off the bathroom sink's plug chain and then posted it down the sink overflow.
I have just spent an hour trying to retrieve it to but no luck so far. The overflow is internal to the ceramics of the sink so there are no bits I can remove to get at the chain. I did hook some of the chain up earlier but it snapped when pulled and so half is still left down the overflow.
Any ideas please.
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi Adam
1. Get a new girl-friend :-)
2. No idea how you can remove it. Have you tried a small magnet on a wire, or similar? Maybe remove U-bend etc and attack from below?
3. Prob worth testing the overflow (fill up sink or pour straight into overflow) and see whether the flow rate is noticeably restricted. I doubt it is - and in any case modern sink overflows can't cope with modern water pressure / tap-flow.
4. In extremis, is this a potential ins claim?
HTH, if only slightly,
--
Martin




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You mean one that can remove the chain?

Not possible, the overflow is part of the sink ceramics not a seperate overflow like the kitchen sink is. I am fishing with some wire that I have bent at the ends into hooks for now.

The overflow works very slowly at the moment. I mean very slowly

I can buy a new sink for less than the excess on my insurance.
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't. Your idea sounds even better....!

I realised that, but (as Keith has said) it may be possible to get at it from below....

Maybe net-curtain wire, per the freezer-water thread, but with a hook screwed in the end...?

OK.
Plus your time, redecorating / re-tiling the surrounding area etc...? But I agree - I'm not one for trivial ins claims either.
Sorry - run out of ideas, unless back flushing is feasible in the hope the chain will dislodge then fall all the way down to the outlet.
--
Martin




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
try fishing with a very small fish hook on thread.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadworth wrote:

What is it (the chain) made of? eg chromium plated brass / stainless steel.
It may be possible to remove the material chemically. However, the chemicals needed are extremely hazardous and will need proper disposal and will need to be kept in contact with the chain for possibly hours..The good news is, of course, that glazed ceramics are reasonably chemical-resistant.
If it is possible to retrieve the end again and make electrical contact to it, other (much less hazardous) chemicals can be used. The outlet is sealed as before (but with an electrode) and just a little electrolyte added. Each time the current falls, more electrolyte can be added, ensuring that the material is removed from the bottom up and hence all is removed..It should all be gone in an hour.
-- Sue
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.