Painting external woodwork


This is likely to be the first of many questions for the newsgroup. We have just moved into a new to us, but very old, house - 1650 or so.
There are quite a lot of (quite high) bargeboards need painting, as well as windows etc. My first query is about what brand paints to use? What lasts best and is easiest to use - assuming those two requisites are compatible. And how many coats, etc? My second query is a more general one - any general tips about doing this sort of job, given that we've never done anything like it before?
Many thanks in advance.
Keith
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Hi.
Assuming that you're using the correct paint type for the job, then the main factor in exterior durability is not brand (suprisingly!) but is the number of coats. I've tested this with a number of different products with one, two and three coats - and the durability just gets better the more you put on. This is not so suprising when you think about where trouble starts - i.e. film defects. It is more likely that edges, holes etc will not be covered when you only use one coat.
It is for this reason that "one-coat" exterior products shouldnt be taken at their word. Always do more than one coat.
As for products - If you are coating wood & you want it white - I like the Sadolin woodshield.
http://www.sadolin.co.uk/homeowner/products/exterior/woodshieldopaquewoodprotection/description
If you are going for a coloured gloss, then try the 10year gloss
http://www.international-paints.co.uk/details.php?productidG
If you're not painting - but using a stain or a varnish - so that "the natural beauty of the wood shows through" (is the popular phrase!), then I would favour stains over varnishes and coloured products over clear (they protect better). As for brand, it is worth spending a bit more as the top end products are likely to have more UV absorber - which will protect your wood for longer. Try Sikkens / Sadolin.
General advise - follow the instructions on the tin! And prepare well. Make sure you get a clean, fresh surface to coat. Use a Fungicidal wash to get rid of any green stuff.
Good luck www.diypaint.co.uk
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Keith Dunbar wrote:

Keith,
Firstly, whatever you do, please avoid the 'one-coat' wonder or 'non-drip' paints if you want longevity and a 'good job' well done.
Secondly, to me 'easy to use' and a good job , are incompatible - to get the best job you have to use plenty of the old fashioned 'elbow grease' and have plenty of patience.
Thirdly, when working at height - especially if you are new to the world of DIY building renovation and working on an old building - safety is paramount at all times!
Please use some form of good quality, quick erect scaffolding for all the high stuff - including windows. The reasons: [1] You are bound to find rot and you will require to eradicate this. So a safe working space is essential. [2] When you get to 'into the job', it's quite easy to 'forget' your working off a ladder - with sometimes disastrous consequences...
Fourthly, the method.
[1] A visual and physical check for rot and the condition of the existing paint work - at this stage, you will make the decision to either simply rub down or burn the old paint off.
[2] Eradicate any obvious rot and rub down all the paint work - feather edging any chips etc and prime any new timbers and spot prime any bare patches with a good, oil-based primer (do not use quick drying acrylic water-based primers). Note: once rubbed down, wash the paint work with white spirit and allow it to dry (simply to remove any grease and dust).
[3] Fill the woodwork as necessary, rub down and again spot prime bare patches.
[4] Gently rub down the spot primer and give at least two coats of a good oil-based undercoat (more of needed), rubbing down between coats - reiterating the warning on the use of acrylic paints.
[5] Give two coats of a good oil-base gloss coat.
[6] Suppliers, I have used AKZO Nobel Permoglaze paints for years (link here)
http://www.akzonobel.co.uk/index.htm with good results - have a look at the site for info. Most other middle of the range paints should be ok - but heed the warning of my opening statement.
To finish - remember that the secret of good paint work is the amount of time and effort you spend on the preparation - skimp on this, and you can use the most expensive paint going and end up re-painting the lot in less than a couple of years. Do it properly, and you can forget repainting for at least five years.
This is a brief description and I'm sure that others will have differing ideas and suggestions to improve on my method.
Enjoy the job
Brian G
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Thanks for the advice - very helpful..
Keith

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