New Floorboards Curling


I'd be grateful for any comments on this. We just had new floorboards laid in a house we're renovating. It's been down just a couple of months and there is a noticeable 'curling up' of some of the boards along the tongue and grooved edges.
We're meeting the contractor on-site soon and would really appreciate any advice anyone might have on what's causing this.
Thanks
Steve
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Significantly different humidity above and below the boards; the underfloor is much more humid than above the floor. This is probably an indication of insufficient ventilation below the floor, or an actual source of excessive moisture, such as a leaking pipe and pooling water. Using a dehumidifier in the house can also cause such damage by excesssively drying the air in the house.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On Sun, 15 May 2005 09:20:16 GMT, "newsonline"
said:

The boards were tongued and groved on the wrong side for that cut of the tree. All planks of this type of wood curl but the curl part is meant to be laid face down so the curl is discouraged by their position.
Anyone who makes table tops has to be careful to get each plank the right way up, unless using an expensive wood with little grain.
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Curling is due to the moisture levels in the subfloor and air: How old is the subfloor? Old subfloors may not have had a DPM (Damp Proof Membrane) installed - a new floor may not have had time to dry out. Did the Contractor take a moisture reading before installation? If so what was it and was it in accordance with the manufacturers specification? Did the Contractor lay or paint a DPM before installing the timber? Were the boards allowed to acclimatise before installation? Finally are they from a "good" manufacturer? The old adage of "you only get what you pay for" is especially true with solid timber. When a price is lower than something else, that is claimed to be the same quality, something has to be missing - thickness - stability - workmanship - can you work out what before seeing the Contractor?
Steve
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IME cheap floorboards always curl, the humidiity above and below is irrelevant (unless really excessive) Pull one board up and have a look at the end grain, if it is good stuff then it would have pretty well up and down grain, but cheap stuff is cut so that you have grain going across , you may even be able to see the growth rings clearly, like a smiley face. (or a frown !)
mrcheerful
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laid
tongue
any
you
a
A million thanks to everyone who replied to my post. Met the contractor and he agreed that the materials weren't up to scratch. Consequently, he's going to replace the floor - no quibbles - no fuss. Phew !
Regards
Steve
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On Tue, 17 May 2005 09:28:51 GMT, "newsonline"
said:

/me raises glass to you.
:))
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and
at
(or
and
going
Was Mr. Contractor pleased that you had gained knowledge?
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