Mains socket under combi boiler - ok?

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I'm trying to put a mains socket in a kitchen and get it as far away from the sink as possible but that will mean it has to go under the boiler. Do the regs allow a mains sockt to be installed under a combi boiler?
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    clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk writes:

Yes. You are supposed to keep gas and electric services separated, but I've never seen anyone take any notice of that. I can't recall what the distance is (it's part of gas regs, not electric regs).
Obviously, if the combi leaks, it could trip the RCD and cause additional inconvenience. I wouldn't do it for that reason.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Sep 29, 12:11 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Yes, that's exactly what I had in mind but frankly it's a choice between being close to the sink where I can definitely see the possibility of a water dousing or under the combi where the chance of a leak is slim. If there's no regs against it I'm going to stick it under the combi.
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On 29/09/2011 12:29, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Can't it go below but immediately to the left or right of the combi, where at least dripping or running water won't go straight on to it?
David
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http://s428.photobucket.com/albums/qq6/adamko2020/?action=view&current=img048.jpg
I already had it so someone else must have asked.

As could a leak anywhere else in the house.
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Adam



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In article

To comply with Part P, sockets in te kitchen now need to be installed (or checked) by a qualified installer.
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"checked by a qualified installer"? Surely a Part-P qualified intaller can only certify his own work. If you DIY it don't you need to get building control in to check it?
Robert
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In article

a qualified installer can check on others' work, but the trade bodies don't like it. (I was told this by an NICEIC contractor) Since our Building Control people don't have anyone with even a basic knowledge of electrical work, I'd rather find someone else to do the checks.
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The work could be done by someone other than the part P registered installer doing the notification, but the work must be "supervised".
Of course the level of supervision required is variable.
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Adam



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RobertL wrote:

The surveyor notices it when you sell.
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Tciao for Now!

John.

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(a) if done properly then nothing will go wrong, or (b) tell them that the work was done before part P existed.
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Adam



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On Thu, 29 Sep 2011 14:51:32 +0100 John Williamson wrote :

When I sold I honestly declared that I had done sundry unapproved alterations to the electrics and no comment was raised. If I'd been pushed I would paid for a periodic inspection report, knowing that all was OK
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Tony Bryer, Greentram: 'Software to build on',
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John Williamson wrote:

I sold my house last year, which had had a kitchen refurbishment three years previously. The work wasn't certified.
The buyer's solicitor's questionnaire asked these questions:
- Has any electrical work been carried out aince 2005 Y/N
- answer: Y
- is a certificate available for this work Y/N
- answer: N
I doubt the buyers even read it.
When we bought our current house, the surveyor didn't comment on the electrics as he had no way of testing them. He had to red-flag them in his report, though, because there was no certificate available, and that's what the surveyor's trade union says they must do. The certificate turned up in the 3" bundle of papers we got from the seller's solicitor.
The whole system is basically a joke.
--

TF

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On 30/09/2011 09:28, Terry Fields wrote:

Same here; no questions were raised and that was that. I suspect basically it's all fine until you get an antsy buyer with an arse-covering solicitor: it's the solicitor who may well raise it as a problem.
A remember selling on an ex-council house which had a flat concrete roof area out the back. The roof slab had been built into the cavity wall when the house was built (1950s?) with basically a large mortar fillet at the wall-roof junction, as it had been since day 1: it perfectly good condition and showing no signs of any leaks or weather damage.
Surveyor points out that it's poor building practice or something and that there should be lead flashing at the joint. Bloody joke; as having worked on the house myself and known it inside out, it wasn't exactly the worst issue he could have raised. Ultimately the result was I spent half a day and £50 or so on bunging some lead up there, and all was well. (Yeah I know, but a buyer's market at the time; with an antsy buyer/ares-covering solicitor combo, so a pragmatic decision on my part).
David
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It's not that simple for me. I'm doing this under a building notice so the council electrician wiil have to pass the work. That's why I have to be sure it's done according to regs.
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On 30/09/2011 14:02, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

In which case ask the BCO in question. Its not unknown for BCOs to have their own pet likes and dislikes that have nothing to do with the actual rules etc. (as long term readers will recall with bloody minded BCO and a cooker point!)
There is no regulatory requirement[1] that I am aware of to not put a socket under the boiler (and indeed boilers will frequently need a FCU in close proximity anyway), however common sense suggests one would avoid doing so if its easy to do so. In this case I would try to keep the suggested distance from the gas pipe etc if you can, but fit the socket since it sounds like that is the only place for it, and you need it.
[1] Save for the general requirement that accessories should be chosen so as to be appropriate for the location.
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Cheers,

John.

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On 30/09/2011 17:48, John Rumm wrote:

When I was ordering new windows from a local firm a few years back, they asked me who my BCO was, as depending on the answer, they would either fit or not fit trickle vents (apparently get it wrong either way and the windows would fail...)
David
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On 29/09/2011 14:51, John Williamson wrote:

So much stuff seems to be written about part P - much of it verging on folklore.
Part P has no requirements for "qualification" as such - but that is a separate issue.
Controlled and notifiable jobs can be done by anyone regardless of their qualifications or technical competence. The notification aspect can be either by self certification if you are a member of a body that permits permits you to self certify, or it can be done under a building notice.
There is no remit within the legislation to allow someone to certify someone else's work for notification purposes unless they "supervise" the work.
This puts most LABCs in a difficult position since they frequently don't have staff with the appropriate skills to make a judgement, and have to pay for an external firm to inspect and report.

I think that could be more simply phrased:
"you will get away with it" - if we assume you are suggesting that one does the work oneself, and fails to notify the LABC.
(I did ask a local BCO a few years ago how many "electrical only" building notices they get... after some thought, he said "none so far!"). So either people have given up doing their own electrics, or the competent ones who are aware of part P simply ignore it, and the ones without a clue carry on regardless).
Solicitors have long since lost interest in it while conveyancing. Especially since its perfectly acceptable to say "I don't know" to any electrical questions along with "no I have not got any paperwork".
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Cheers,

John.

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Every part of that statement is incorrect.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 29/09/2011 11:51, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

There is no specific wiring regulation to prohibit it, but common sense suggests that right under a boiler is not ideal should you ever get a leak.
(note there are not hard rules about distances from a sink either - although there is a guideline of at least 300mm IIRC)
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Cheers,

John.

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