Loft roof insulation


Has anybody used a DIY spray foam kit to insulate their roof from inside the loft? Cost and "physicality" is an issue, hence the thought to use a spray kit, but is the stuff any good? An alternative would be stapling some sort of membrane across the face of the batons but I can't seem to find the right Google words to track such a thing down. Any help appreciated, thank you.
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Harry wrote:

I think that roofing experts generally condemn the use of spray on foam as a solution to roof and loft insulation. I once insulated a loft of house of mine - that didn't have any felt under the slates - by nailing strips of felt on the inside. I did this by fitting it snugly to the battens and nailing it to the rafters on either side - it was quite successful.
It is important to use a good quality 'breathable' felt.
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    Lucky Jim <Jim'llfixit.com> writes:

It will raise concern with any surveyor when you sell too. It's normally only done when a roof is at the end of its life as a stop-gap, and this is what the surveyor will have to assume being unable to see the roof structure anymore, so it will likely knock something like the value of a replacement roof off your house.
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On 01 Jul 2008 12:10:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

I do like the idea of stapling another layer of felt to the batons though, I could manage that. Many thanks both.
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http://www.screwfix.com/prods/58068/Building/Pitch-Roofing-Insulation/Pitch-Roofing-Insulation-600mm-Centre-x-65mm
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On 1 Jul, 18:23, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

Without knowing exactly what you are trying to achieve I would say you would be wasting your money particularly if you are trying to comply to b/regs standards. For a flat ceiling over a bedroom the the insulation needs to be laying between and over the ceiling joists. If you have sloping attic ceilings, ie a loft conversion or loft room, the insulation should be between and under the rafters. If you explain your intentions more clearly I can give you more advice.
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foor is already done. Personal physical issues mean spray foam was a, seemingly, attractive option but the answers already given have pointed me in the right direction, thank you.
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On Wed, 2 Jul 2008 00:52:20 -0700 (PDT), a particular chimpanzee, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

If the answers have pointed you in the direction of that Screwfix link, then you need a new compass too.
It MAY be a possibility, but you have to look at two things:
First, this won't meet current B/Regs requirements, so if you are doing a legal loft conversion, then you will have to alter it.
Secondly, you need to ensure that there is sufficient ventilation over the insulation. If you have no existing felt there may be enough coming through the tiles, but if there is felt already there, or if the tiles are close-fitting or interlocking, there may not be enough. You need to leave a gap of between 25-50mm over the insulation, depending on whether there's any sag in the felt and the amount of air flowing.
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