lighting question


Hi, I have lust bought a new light fir the living room, on it is says 60 watt max, however I use energy saving light bulbs, which means a 20 watt bulb is equivalent to a 100 watt bulb, so can I use one of these in the light, or is this still classed as 100 watt?
thanks
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 22:58:10 +0100, "Keith Hampson"

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what does this mean, 11 watt max?
babbled like a waterfall and said:

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are you saying the maimum energy saving light bult to fit my light is 11 watt, ?
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 23:13:07 +0100, "Keith Hampson"

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I have been using 20w energy saving bulbs in my lights for a few years now and never had any trouble whatsoever. The heat from the actual bulb is negligable. I can put my hand on the bulb whilst lit and it is only warm to the touch. Try that with a normal 100w bulb. - troubleinstore
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Not sure what neon has to do with compact florescent lamps?
60 watts is 60 watts regardless of whether incandescent or a CFL.
Fitting a 20 watt CFL in a 60 watt fitting is something I have done for quite a few years, especially in outside "carriage" lamps. Never had a problem, and heat damage is never a problem, unlike fitting a 60 watt lamp in an enclosed 60 watt fitting..................
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You'd be hard pushed to find a 60W CFL! 26W is the best I've seen which I use in some '60W max' shades and of course they're fine as they don't produce as much heat. As the man says '60W is 60W' whether it's incandescent or CFL. CFL's don't seem to give as much light as the incandescent of the wattage they're meant to be equivalent too - so get the highest wattage you can fit in the fitting if you don't want to be in the gloom.

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Seconded
Adam
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Keith Hampson wrote:

Yes no prolbem. Your light fitting can cope with 60w of heat, so 20w will be fine.
having said that, the bigger cfl bulbs often cant cope in enclosed fittings, so if its a glass ball type you might find bulbs die quickly on you.
Finally the claimed equivalent figs are massaged, the real equivalency ratio is 3.5-4. So if you really want 100w, you dont want a 20.
NT
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