Keyhole (mortice) draught (rubber) excluder/stopper (for mortice lock)??

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I'm looking (probably along with a lot of people this week!) for a draught excluder for a mortice lock keyhole. My Mum is (rightly) complaining of the draught whistling through the door lock. It's for doors with a standard keyhole lock/handle arrangement where there isn't already an escutcheon. I could adapt a standard escutcheon, but I've been looking for anything that resembles a rubber plug (a true plug would get in the way of the key, and isn't ideal, but she'd probably put up with it for the sake of the warmth, but there might be a middle road).
I've stumbled across a couple of possibilities, both on ebay (although now ended auction), but sadly the manufacturers have either disappeared or discontinued production. See: http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/KEYHOLE-DRAUGHT-EXCLUDER-/120640961146 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/2-X-KEY-HOLE-DRAUGHT-EXCLUDERS-/290502983676
I know there are plenty of escutcheon covers, which I could adapt, but having seen this rubber insert, I'd really like to exhaust all avenues of finding something like it before I use an escutcheon as the rubber stopper route is so neat (and very unintrusive). I could probably rig one up with a bit of old bicycle inner tube as well, but just (again) exhausting all avenues)
Does anyone know of suitable/similar products?
Thanks in advance
Allan
x-post uk.d-i-y free.uk.diy.home
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Allan wrote:

"For the sake of the warmth"? Don't be silly. The chilling effect of a keyhole-sized "gale" is likely to be subliminal unless one positions oneself directly in the jet.
But old ladies are impossible to convince on the basis of anything rational, so I guess you do have to do *something*.
Nothing wrong with a plug (or even a bit of gaffer tape). Put it on the inside, then you never need to remove it. One should only ever lock the door on the mortice from the outside (when one is out and no-one is in). Locking it from the inside is dangerous - you don't want to have to be finding and fiddling with a key in a panic when there's a fire and you need to get out in a hurry. But perhaps even this is too rational and hence unconvincing.
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A blob of Blue Tack. Unfortunately most people use the key to lock the front door from the inside.
Mr Pounder

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Raygun wrote:

Doesn't work if you only have a mortice lock though.
--
Jeff Gaines Wiltshire UK
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Jeff Gaines wrote:

In that case, if you don't want to put in a yale type as well, I would recommend putting in a good old fashioned sliding bolt.
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On Tue, 14 Dec 2010 11:30:47 +0000, Ronald Raygun wrote:

I think you'd be surprised how much air can come whistling (literally) through a mortice lock hole. Blocking them up here does make a noticeable difference to the comfort of the room and in ajoining rooms as the draft is less and not as icy.

The infreqently used doors have parcel tape over the hole. The front door has a bit of copper (snipped from an old water cylinder) pivoted on a brass screw hanging over the hole.
I've have thought that short bit of long bristled brush type draft excluder behind the handle plate might work quite well but have not got the tuit to try it, yet. Tape works...
--
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Dave.




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Not really much more dangerous, given there's a fire anyway. But which is more likely? Fire, or burglary? I'd say the latter, and the latter is a very good reason for locking the door from the inside as well as from the out. If the door has glass or thin wood panels, it's easy to break in by breaking the glass or panel next to the latch and reaching in and opening it from the inside. It's a second or two's work, literally, before thugs are inside and able to threaten you.
On Tue, 14 Dec 2010 11:30:47 +0000, Ronald Raygun

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Java Jive wrote:

Eh? The door is your means of escape. If you can't find the key, you're in trouble. Remember there may be dense smoke, so if you simply drop the key on the floor you may not be able to find it again.
You may choose to leave the key in the lock, but that's not very good either. For one thing, if one of you is in, and the other is out, the one wanting to come in may not be able to get the key in the door. There's always the doorbell, but if the one on the inside is having a heart attack... For the other, if you leave the key in the lock, then the burglar can also get in, having smashed a panel.

Agreed.
Not really. If anyone's in, a burglar is going to high-tail it out of there pdq, in most cases. Aggravated burglary with violence is very much rarer than ordinary stealthy burglary. Perhaps as rare as fire.

If you make the door too secure, they'll just use a window instead.
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"Ronald Raygun" wrote in message
Allan wrote:

"For the sake of the warmth"? Don't be silly. The chilling effect of a keyhole-sized "gale" is likely to be subliminal unless one positions oneself directly in the jet.
But old ladies are impossible to convince on the basis of anything rational, so I guess you do have to do *something*.
Nothing wrong with a plug (or even a bit of gaffer tape). Put it on the inside, then you never need to remove it. One should only ever lock the door on the mortice from the outside (when one is out and no-one is in). Locking it from the inside is dangerous - you don't want to have to be finding and fiddling with a key in a panic when there's a fire and you need to get out in a hurry. But perhaps even this is too rational and hence unconvincing.
------------------------------------------------
So long as you don't want to be insured... most insurance company security conditions require all locks to be locked and keys removed at night.
The danger is in removing the keys to an inaccessible place.
Chris R
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However, if you want to lock both the back and front doors when you go out, it's a lot more convenient to lock one from inside and walk through the house than it is to lock both from outside. The risk that you lock one and only then find that your path to the other door is blocked by fire is tiny.
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Ronald Raygun wrote:

I'm amazed at the amount of people who lock the front door from inside while they are at home. Very often when I ring the bell it takes them several minutes to find the keys & open the door. Those minutes could kill you in a fire as you say.
I often mention the fire risk, but it seems to go straight over their heads.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
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Do you have a fire extinguisher at home?
Mr Pounder

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Fire extinguishers are too dangerous for the untrained home user, they encourage people to get trapped.
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Certainly if you're in a room and the furniture catches fires, you've got a minute or two *at most* before you're gonna be dead.
--
Tim

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Firstly, my furniture won't do that.
Secondly, I can put the fire out with one of my extinguishers (at least one on each floor) and take my time.
In a world of Dennis' stupidity, that's probably his best so far.
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In article

What, won't catch fire? What's it made of? I'm talking about yer standard furniture, e.g. a sofa with foam rubber filling or whatever it is.

Perhaps, but most folks don't have them.
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Tim

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The beds are foam rubber, but that's not a bad fire hazard. _Polyurethane_ foam is the real risk, and I don't have any. Sofas are traditional.
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In article

Yes, that's the stuff I meant.
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Tim

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wrote:

There is an odd belief that modern furniture is fire proof. Its actually flame resistant. Its hard to ignite it with stuff like cigarettes. (Hmm? that's another expense thrust upon us by smokers. Non smokers get little benefit from fire proof furniture IMO.) It certainly burns in the right circumstances and gives out toxic smoke.

What he means is he can try and put it out. If it works fine. If it doesn't he has wasted time which could have been used to get to safety. That's why the fire service doesn't recommend extinguishers in homes, people think they can tackle a blaze and get killed. I think that if you want to protect the building from fire there are far better ways than putting a few hand operated extinguishers in. You can fit domestic sprinklers and fire proof as much of the contents as possible, remove ignition sources, etc.
They do say a fire blanket can be useful to smother chip pan fires, I personally don't have a chip pan as putting them out can be really scary and I had to when I was about 14 using a wet towel.
I will stick with the idea of getting out fast and letting the insurance company worry about the damage.
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So are you a fire expert this week? I'll add that to your list of made up talents.
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Adam



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