Is It advisable...


to tile straight onto plasterboard? I realise it will cause major damage if the tiles need to be removed but this wont be an issue.
TIA
John
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John wrote:

British Gypsum now carry a 'special' plasterboard for use in bathrooms, where there is a risk of the background getting wet. If the area of intended use is completely dry, then you should be okay.
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And then there is aquapanel - which doesn't care if you make baths out of it. (though it wouldn't be very comfortable)
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Bypass wrote:

Is that the sort that doesn't disintegrate when you skim it with sopping wet plaster then?
;-)
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if
The problem with tiling direct to PB is(and it will over time)vapoured steam will penetrate the PB no matter how much you seal the tiling with grout.
But if you want to do it this way YES you can. My advice is to seal th PB with PVA.
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My home made shower cubical is tiled straight onto plasterboard - including the ceiling. None have come off yet in about 20 years. ;-)
--
*Okay, who stopped the payment on my reality check? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Provided it's done right and no cracks appear due to movement, there should be no problem. The tiles in my shower cubicle are on painted (emulsion) plasterboard, the shower has been in for 7 years. Last year I took the lathe and plaster off the other side of the wall and there was no sign of any water penetration.
Mike
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George wrote:

So what. As long as it dries out faster than it gets in who cares?
Do you have a problem in your plasterboard ceilings over a steamy bath? In a kitchen? Do ceilings fall down juts becasue a kettle gets boiled under rthem?
What twaddle you do talk.
If the water can get in, it can get out.
Plasterboard doesn't mind humidity. It can actually even stand being sopping wet. For a short while. Once its tile the tiles add a hige amount of waterproofing and a huge amount of sctial strength as wel. YOu migh say that all the plasterboard does is stop the *tile* wall from buckling and you would not be far wrong
I have even had plasterboard get utterly soaked from a leak inside a stud wall. Nothing happened. It stayed up.

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It'll be fine.
--
*How come you never hear about gruntled employees? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Yes, no problem! When you want to remove the tiles, simply remove the plasterboard and replace with new. Plasterboard is cheap!
Even if you skim it first, you're still not going to be left with a useable surface when you subsequently remove the tiles.
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Cheers,
Roger
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John wrote:

Yes, most professional tilers prefer PB as a background rather than plaster
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Phil L wrote:

Grabs very well and is more even generally.
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