Insulating Solid walls

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Tim Lamb wrote:

Oh, yes. If you are plasterboard lining a modern block structure, simply use foil backed, and accept the fact it screws the phones and radios..but the celotex will do that anyway! You shouldn't have any problems anyway though if celotexing outside..IF you make the celotex airtight to the block, the 'cold' surface is the outer skin of the celotex. But its already got its own vapour barrier.
The walls will be warm. Thats the whole point!

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On May 2, 6:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote: > I don't claim any particular expertise here, but a vapour barrier

might it not form on the inner side of the celotex having migrated through the walls from inside the house?
Robert
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RobertL wrote:

No. because thats the 'warm' side of the insulation IF you seal airgaps If not, the insulation is a waste anyway.,

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I believe its best to put insulation on the outside, as then the walls are a heat sink - the book i borrowed from the library was so good that i bought it over ebay... (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Insulate and Weatherize: Expert Advice from Start to Finish (Build Like A Pro) (Paperback) by Bruce Harley (Author) "There is a lot of misconception, folklore, and conflicting information about the consequences of weatherizing a house: ""A house has to breathe-you don't want it..." (more)
[g]
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george (dicegeorge) wrote:

which is a positive in summer, but a possible negative in winter.
You need the heating on earlier - much earlier.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember The Natural Philosopher

It would tend to even out I believe. I don't have any figures, but I've noticed thick-walled houses, if decently draught-free and properly DGd are definitely more temperature stable than thin-wall modern build. Outside insulation would even out the temperature swings even more and lead to less fuel being used as top-up heating. In my own situation, I plan to install outside insulation to 10" thick solid concrete walls and avoid interior disruption. This, allied with UFH, should provide a decent cosiness.
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On Tue, 05 May 2009 21:29:42 +0100, Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

I don't know about anybody else, but if I work out how much I have to pay for every square foot of internal space, then figure out how much of it I'd lose with 10" of internal insulation, it would take a *lot* of extra heating to make up the difference.
External is the only way that makes sense, unless you have far too much room in your house at present. Not a problem I've ever been faced with...
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Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

Well the figures suggest it doesn't even out. If your target is say 19C for the evening period, you will on average be warmer outside those periods than if the house was a insulated egg carton. The heatloss will be more, on average.
Here, with 24x7 occupancy, the high thermal mass suits our lifestyle.
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On Sat, 2 May 2009 01:03:38 +0100, SimonJ wrote:

Is it so old that it doesn't already have a DPC?

Solid walls are not very good insulators, they have high thermal mass which can help regulate internal temperatures but they have relatively low thermal resistance.
In my view inside is probably the simpler method but with the disadvantage of making the rooms a bit smaller.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Just leaving aside all the opinions you now have about rising damp, two good reasons to insulate exterior walls such as yours is to 1) reduce cold bridging which will mean spending more on heating, and 2) to reduce or prevent condensation which can be a major cause of damp, probably more so than rising damp.
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