Hanging a door


Hi Group, More advice please. Recently the bin men left left my dustbin locker door open. In the high winds the door was wrenched out of the frame. I rehung the door but due to the damage to the door frame I had to reposition the hinges and now the door springs open. What have I done wrong and what is the remedy please? I do have a chippies toolboxleft to me by my father. Many thanks Alan
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Roberts wrote:

What sort of hinges? surface mounting, such as this:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id 897&tsr659
Or hidden hinges, such as these:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id 079&tsr745
With the former, it is important to leave a very small clearance between the door and the frame, behind the hinge. Otherwise, if the screws pull the door towards the frame as they are tightened, or the wood of the door swells, or you paint it, the door will spring open. The cure is to either use the existing screw holes and plane a little off the edge of the door that runs under the hinge, or reposition the hinges on door and/or frame to give the necessary clearance.
With the latter, it can be because the hinges have been recessed too far into the door edge and or frame. The same thing happens as with the other hinge type - if the wood swells, or the door is painted, when the door is closed the wood in the "gap" gets in the way. The solution is to pack out the hinges by putting strips of thin card behind them, until they are flush with the wood surface, or plane down the edge of the door/frame (tricky).
Alternatively:
It may be that the gap between door and frame is uneven. Look for signs where the wood of the door has been running against the wood of the frame, in the gap between edge of door and frame. If you find any, plane the rubbing sections down a little and close the door a few times to see if you get new rub marks. Repeat until either you get bored, you have removed so much wood you can't find the door, or, hopefully, the door closed properly.
--
Sue



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Hi Alan, it sounds like the top & bottom hinges are not vertically aligned. Try checking with a spirit level or plumb line.

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my
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Roberts wrote:

Alan,
The door is probably 'hingebound'.
There are several causes for this:
1 If using Butt hinges - these are probably sunk too deep into the door or frame or possibly both (use pieces of cardboard etc under the leaf of the hinge to pack it back up to the correct level [trial and error method] as you need to have the correct gap between the leaves of the hinges and between door and frame) It is also possible that you have used screws that are too big (or non-countersunk) and these are 'catching' on their heads (just remove these and fit the correct screws.
2 If using Tee hinges - these are probably screwed too far back onto the frame (just move them out sufficiently to have a small gap between door and frame)
3 The door is catching on the 'planted' or fixed doorstops on the doorframe (if 'planted' simply pull them away from the frame on the hinge side and re-nail them with a small gap between the stops and the door. If 'fixed' then you will have to move the hinges out slightly)
4 Note that the above can also apply to the ends of the 'ledges' on a ledged and braced door. To cure this, you either move the door stops or just trim the end of the ledge with a handsaw or similar
5 Lastly, it is possible that you have the (butt) hinges out of plumb and plain old gravity is causing the unlatched door to swing open (just plumb the hinges and all should be ok - or the same thing has happened to the hanging leg of the door frame, its been forced out of plumb and again gravity takes over - re-plumb the frame and all should be ok).
Brian G
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