Gas Pipes thru walls


I'm going to run a gas pipe from the meter to the kitchen the other side of the wall (trying to save costs, leaving the connections for the corgi man later in the week)
I beleive I need to run the pipe through a sleeve if going through a wall
so for 15m I use a peice of 22mm ?
and if I opt for 22mm to make sure enough flow for the oven and hob i run this through " " what exactly ?
can I use plastic waste pipe ?
--
Vass



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You are correct. All gas pipes that pass through a wall need to be sleeved

That would be fine

32mm waste pipe is fine for 22mm copper. You can use copper, steel, polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride as sleeving (but steel must not come into contact with PVC). The sleeve will need sealing on the inside between the sleeve and pipe and between the sleeve and brickwork. Your Corgi man will explain more (mine did)
Adam
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Forgive me for asking - but why?
I thought the principle was to put a barrier between mortar which attacks copper. I accept that there is likely to be movement over time. Also isn't tape sufficient or is that only acceptable when embedded in concrete. How would you have a gas pipe go through a plastered wall? Most plasterers would plaster up to the pipe so plaster would be in contact with copper.
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The Corgi plumber I used when I did my gas (I did the hard work he just connected up) says
"All pipes that pass through a wall or floor of a building must be sleeved. This applies to all walls not lust load bearing walls. Gas Safety(installation and Use) Regulations. Part D, Regulation 19(2b)" From handbook 4 of the Domestic Natural Gas Handbook.
The point of sleeving is to not just to prevent damage to the gas pipe. In the case of a cavity wall it is to prevent a gas build up in the cavity should there be a leak. Hence you seal between the sleeve and the brickwork on both sides of the wall and on the inside between the sleeve and pipe. If you have a leak inside the wall the gas will be expelled outside.
Most internal walls are plastered and external walls left bare. The plasterer would be plastering over the seals so no problem. Also plaster is not corrosive to copper AFAIK.
You would need to sleeve and seal a gas pipe through a stud wall for the reasons given above and you would need to tape up a copper pipe that is laid in concrete etc for the reasons you give (ie corrosion)
Adam
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Many thanks for that info.
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The nice Corgi guy has given me a copy of the book today. It will not make me a Corgi plumber but it will be a good read (when I have finished the latest Potter book of course)
Adam
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