Fruit Juicer for eye problem

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wrote:

The carrots myth was deliberate disinformation released during WW2. It was intended to hide from the Krauts the fact that that all their messages to Uboats were being decoded with the Bombe and Colossus machines at Bletchley Park. The lie was that a diet of carrots enabled the Coastal Command air crews to see in the dark.
Seventy years on, the myth still lives! Heh Heh! To the gullible anyway.

The version I grew up with was the myth was promulgated to cover up the fact that our air crews had magnetron powered radar sets.
--
Graham.

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On 13/03/2011 19:55, Graham. wrote:

Yup, I think that is closer to the truth - it was supposed to explain why our pilots were so effective at finding incoming aircraft and hide our progress on RADAR.
(whether this has anything to do with the role (if any) of carrots and cataracts is another matter!)
--
Cheers,

John.

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Jimmy Rawnsley (scuse spelling I may be a little off) who was "Cats Eye" Cunningham's radar operator/navigator throughout most of the war specifically references that myth in his wartime biography of Wing Commander Cunningham, "Night Fighter".
He also jokes about the vitamin pills they were issued, apparently most aircrew saved them up for when they were going for a night out on the town ... but nevertheless failed to have any appreciable effect if you know what I mean. It's a bit like eating a plate of oysters before that "special time", I've never known more than the first 7 to work ;-)
--

All the best,

Chris

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Cavity magnetrons. Everyone had magnetrons (of simpler form).
The funny thing, (thanks to RV Jones' misinformation on TV), is that so many Brits think the cavity magnetron was solely British. In fact, everyone had cavity magnetrons too, except the Germans. The Czechs probably invented them, the Russians developed them early on, the Japanese had the best design (they solved two problems early on, one of which eluded the British right through the war).
British nightfighters were never as effective as the Germans, because their relative phases of the war were a couple of years apart - by the time the technology was in place for really effective air interception at night, there just weren't as many German bombers attacking the West.
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We have one of these:
http://www.matstonejuicer.biz /
and the pulp that comes out is quite dry - it makes really nice juice out of anything vaguely moist... (apple and carrot is qute nice) However you do have to chop the fruit, veg, etc. into small pieces before it will go through and there's always the cleaning afterwards...
And while not quite industrial quality, it did take most of a tree of bramleys last year, giving us nearly 20 litres of apple juice - and only overheated twice... (and took 2 of us the best part of a day)
As for the eyes... dunno - I'd see a doctor if they were mine!
Gordon
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In message

I thought it was to disguise the fact that we had airborne radar (Gee?).
--
Ian

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On Mar 13, 8:05pm, Ian Jackson

An alternative story I've heard was that there was a surplus of carrots.
Chris
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On Mar 13, 8:16pm, snipped-for-privacy@proemail.co.uk wrote:

And not a lot else to eat.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

Oh yes. Potatoes, Cabbage and Carrots.
And that's pretty much all there was till the mid 50's.
And SPAM. Lots of SPAM.
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On 13/03/2011 20:05, Ian Jackson wrote:

That is the version I have always heard, although one use of airborne radar was to detect submarines on the surface at night.
BTW Gee was a navigation system.
Colin Bignell
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Ah, yes. It was H2S, wasn't it? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H2S_radar
--
Ian

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On 13/03/2011 20:39, Ian Jackson wrote:

There were quite a few different radar types during the war, often changing as the technology improved. H2S was a ground mapping bombing aid, while Night Fighters carried a short range air to air radar and were talked to within their radar range by controllers using ground based radar.
Colin Bignell
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writes

If you're interested in such things, I recommend Bernard Lovell's [1] biography, he was heavily involved with the development of radar and describes the endless frustrations of manufacture and installation being unable to keep up with development. Problems rearising during the design and building of Joddrell bank [2].
Anyway, since no-one else has so far said it, I'll say it. Of course carrots are good for your eyesight. You never see a rabbit wearing glasses.
[1] Later Sir Bernard. [2] Built at least partly with kit he nicked at the end of the war. Well no-one else knew what it did or what to do with it.
Steve
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@mail.invalid says...

It's also said, on some sites, that you get a better sound from your digital equipment if you pay a grand for a cable.
Is there actually any reliable evidence?
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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wrote:

This review says the cheapies are OK.
http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/home-entertainment/1282699/hdmi-investigated-are-expensive-cables-a-scam
but they don't make such an impression on visitors.
rusty
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In article <5dcd24d5-9bad-4191-8d67-76e3edafee64

http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/home-entertainment/1282699/hdmi-investigated-are-expensive-cables-a-scam
Hardly a surprise, was it? Monster Cable must be laughing all the way to the bank, though, 'cos people still keep buying their junk.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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Well you got half of that right

Nothing to do with carrots. Nor did Colossus have anything to do with decoding Enigma codes.
AOL? The old metrics are still the best.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
something like:

Bollocks, anyway. The carrots rubbish was generated on behalf of the British nightfighter pilots who were using a nifty on-board radar set the Jerries hadn't a clue about.
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