Fruit Juicer for eye problem

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It's saying on some websites that the juice from carrots may be of help with Eye Cataracts.
Argos catalogue has two reasonable priced ones of page 699. One is 19.99 and the other is 29.99.
Would anyone have experience of using these particular juicers and would recommend one for using with carrots. Since someone said that carrots are among the more difficult things to juice satifactorarily.
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john morgan wrote:

near you, as well.

<shrug> no idea what ours is, but it mashes most things with violent rapidity.
However most of the guff talked about carrots is exactly that. Guff.
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wrote:

The carrots myth was deliberate disinformation released during WW2. It was intended to hide from the Krauts the fact that that all their messages to Uboats were being decoded with the Bombe and Colossus machines at Bletchley Park. The lie was that a diet of carrots enabled the Coastal Command air crews to see in the dark.
Seventy years on, the myth still lives! Heh Heh! To the gullible anyway.
====================================================================================== Fat lot you know. DoctorExclusive
http://doctorexclusive.com /
Says carrots are helpful for cataracts.
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On 3/13/2011 1:01 PM, john south wrote:

=======================================================================================
A WHOIS search for doctorexclusive.com show that the domain is registered to an individual, who provided a mailing address that belongs to a gas station in St. Petersburg, Florida.
I expect the information on the site is every bit as reputable as that address.
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john south wrote:

=======================================================================================
God exactly, because the Bible itself says so...
http://gospelway.com/bible/bible_inspiration.php
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What does he say about putting pyrex bowls on the hob?
MBQ
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In article <c95667af-344e-46dc-b6d6-4e0d2f4c5ec7

Ah, well, Pyrex isn't what it used to be since it got taken over. It's now soda-lime glass, which is claimed to be as good, and in many cases may be adequate - but borosilicate glass it ain't.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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17:23:07 -0000

You can find lots of other jokes on websites too! What are you supposed to do with it, bath in it?
Stop reading rubbish, go to your GP and get him/her to refer you to a consultant.
If you are worried about the op - particularly if you are thinking of someone who had it many years ago - stop worrying and start looking forward to it!
Local anaesthetic, takes less than half an hour. The cartaract is broken up with ultrasound and removed. A new plastic lens is slipped in to replace the old one and you end up with perfect distance vision - even if you needed glasses before.
I had the first one done about 3 years ago, just as the second one was starting to develop - and I couldn't wait to have that one done too!
After wearing glassses from the age of 14, I no longer need them at all for distance vision at the age of 66. However, I still need them for reading but because I'd been wearing bifocals for twenty years, I never had my reading glasses to hand when I needed them!
So I'm now wearin varifocals because having the the intermediate strength is ideal for the PC.
--

Terry

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Terry Casey ( snipped-for-privacy@example.invalid) wibbled on Sunday 13 March 2011 18:14:

How do you keep still with pointy tools coming towards your eyes - even if anaesthatised? Always wondered that.
--
Tim Watts

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On 13/03/2011 19:55, Tim Watts wrote:

injected into your cheek and paralyses the eye muscles so your eye can't move during the operation and, in my experience, for many hours thereafter. The other anaesthetic is in the form of eye drops which means you can't feel anything. A microscope is used by the surgeon very close to the eye and you can't see anything. They usually give you intravenous Valium so that if you were nervous before (and I was) you feel quite brave during the operation.
The results are fantastic. I was short-sighted since childhood; now I only wear glasses for night driving and long spells of reading. I spent the first month after the operation saying WOW all the time.
Another Dave
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On 13/03/2011 19:55, Tim Watts wrote:

When I had a torn retina repaired under local anaesthetic, the optic nerve was blocked as well, so all I saw was a white blur.
Colin Bignell
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0000

It isn't a problem!
In the first place, the opaque cataract has ruined a lot of the sight in that eye anyway.
Then you are given drops to massively dilate the pupil.
Before the 'pointy tools' come into play, a clamping device is placed on the eye to stop it moving - for very obvious reasons!
The incision is made in the side of the eye so, even if you weren't looking at the out of focus overhead lights, you wouldn't/couldn't see the 'pointy tool' anyway!
In fact, after have two operations in two different hospitals, I can honestly say I didn't see a thing* - and I didn't feel anything, either.
* I think I was vaguely aware when one of the replacement lenses was slid into place but, of course, you can't see it, as such, and with the dilation, the clamp and the anaesthetic you can't focus anyway!
--

Terry

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infinity, like you could when you were young?
--
Ian

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Well two reasons really:
(1) The local anaesthetic not only stops you feeling any pain in your eye, it also stops you blinbking, stops you moving your eye, and then finally, makes your eye stop working (by numbing the opetic nerve) so that eye just goes out - quite weird really. So you can't see the sharp things coming, and they cover the other eye over.
(2) Which leaves just the problem of lying still and not moving your head (even thoug you're lying on a block of wood shaped like the botom of a guillotine!) - however that's easy as soon as you consider that the surgeon who you can hear but not see *is* sticking sharp things in your eyes, so lying still suddenly become pretty simple :-)
Actually, my cataract only took about fifteen minutes, and being fairly young (as cataract patients go) at 58, it took a bit longer to blast my old lens to pieces - so lying still was pretty easy. Now lying still for the hour and a bit that my detached retina took to fix *was* a bit tougher, but then rule (2) above applied even more so in that case!!!
Graham (Now with perfect vision [in one eye] as Terry described above)
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On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 18:14:43 +0000, Terry Casey wrote:

Indeed. My 86 year old mother-in-law had both done (a few months apart, with a hip replacement in between).
She said the only downside was finding out how dirty the kitchen floor was, and having to clean it!
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
  Click to see the full signature.
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Exactly what my aunt said after her op at about the same age - "Why didn't anyone tell me how dirty my house was?"
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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Skipweasel ( snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com) wibbled on Sunday 13 March 2011 21:53:

Because, dear Aunt, you'd have whacked me in the Queensburys with your handbag...
--
Tim Watts

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john morgan wrote:

It's amazing what you can find on the web...

Unless you just happen to like carrot juice, why not look and see if you can find a *single* controlled trial of carrot juice for the treatment and prevention of cataracts.
Tim
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Tim Downie wrote:

I seem to remember some hippy died of an overdose of carrot juice in the 60's

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Paging Bugs Bunny
--
geoff

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