flow of central heating pump


i'm getting the bits together to fuel my motorhome on biodiesel,
will get a 600 litre ibc tank to sit at the back of the garage to store the fuel in, and need to be able to transfer the fuel from it about 15 meters to reach the van's fillers from where i park it (cant get it any closer as the garage is at the end of the house, and the drive down the side of the house is too narrow for the motorhome)
been looking at the fuel transfer pumps, which are basicaly a water pump rated for about 40 litres a minute, and a length of 1 inch hose to a petrol pump type nozzle, there seems to be nothing to stop the pump when the nozzle's valve is shut, dunno about an internal bypass valve, but no mention of one.
anyway, i have in my garage somewhere the central heating pump from the old boiler, a halstead finest gold, now i dont expect 40 litres a minute pump rates, but any ideas of the pump rate? would likely be a bit lower due to pumping bio diesel as opposed to water, but a ballpark figure would help me decide if it's even worth faffing about with the centeral heating pump as a fuel transfer pump,
i plan on mounting the tank about 50cm off the ground over a sump i make to catch any spillage, if i mount the pump on the floor, it'd get a feed of fuel, and be pushing the fuel along the hose and about a meter high to the vans fuel tanks fillers.
it'd only be used for how ever long it takes to transfer 130 litres, and prolly every month during summer,
if it can do the job, would it be worth adding an automatic bypass valve? i.e. a central heating one, so it pumps the fuel back to it's inlet port when the nozzle is closed, or would i have trouble setting the valve due to it being calibrated for water, and me using a thicker fluid. the other option is to run a wire along the hose to the nozzle, and have a switch (via a relay) turn the pump on and off as the lever is pulled in and released.
i've also been thinking about taking delivery of the bio diesel, it comes in 25 litre containers in the back of a van, i could manualy tip each one into the tank, but i was thinking about a set of valves that routes the suction port of the pump to the delivery nozzle, and routes the output port to the top of the tank (bypassing the filter i will have on the draw off valve on the tank) then a length of hose over the nozzle and dip it into the 25 litre containers to suck the fuel up and take it to the main tank, would i have problems with priming the pump tho or things like that?
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 02:43:55 +0000, Gazz wrote:

=============================================== My CH boiler requires a minimum flow of 13.2 litres a minute so most pumps will deliver more than that - so at least 25% of the performance of the fuel transfer pump.
Would it be possible to fit a remote switch to the switch off the pump rather than a by-pass?
Cic.
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13 litres a minute is ok for me, i assume as most pumps are 3 speed, the 13.2 litre bit will be on the lowest setting, so it's worth faffing about with this then (if i could have got in my garage i'd have prolly rigged it up by now and tried it out, but my garage is full of my Gf's stuff from when she moved out of her flat)
i was thinking about a switch on the nozzle, but i was also thinking about a couple of valves so i could suck the fuel from the containers in the back of the biodiesel delivery van into my tank, easiest way i thought would be to have an auto bypass valve tee'd on the outlet, exit from the valve goes to the tank, then a tee valve,
one way and it puts fuel from the outlet of the pump to the nozzle, other way it diverts the nozzle pipe to the suction port of the pump... whcih would have another tee valve to select suck from tank or nozzle via the outlets tee valve takeoff,
then the bypass valve would operate and allow the fuel to go into the tank as the outlet tee valve would be shut off to the pump outlets flow, if that makes sense at all, it works in my head, but that dont mean it'll work in real life.
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 18:19:33 +0000, Gazz wrote:

=============================================== A little bit of confusion has crept in here. The 13.2 l/m I quoted is NOT an actual pump specification. The figure comes from my CH boiler manual which just happened to be to hand; based on the minimum flow figure for my boiler I concluded that any of the standard pumps available (usually 5 metre head) would be capable of at least that figure but probably much more. I hope that makes things a bit clearer.
As far as by-pass valves are concerned I think you might be getting into deep water. I've got one (automatic) here which I've been considering putting in but it looks as if it involves quite a bit of setting up so you might find it impossible to set yours up properly as the viscosity of your oil will vary according to temperature. You might be introducing too many variables. I suppose that it's a question of experimenting starting with the pump and then adding the extra bits as you go. It's often the case that simple solutions are best, but best of luck with what you eventually try.
Cic.
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