FAQ: Want to ask a DIY question? Here's how. (V.16)


[Weekly posting - Archived once a month]
This is an introduction to the UK.D-I-Y newsgroup for new and experienced Do-It-Yourselfers in the United Kingdom. If you want help, or just want to find out more about a problem before calling in 'the professionals' you are welcome to 'pick our brains'.
There is a good chance your query, or a very similar one, has already been discussed and answered by the group, so please have a look at the Google uk.d-i-y archive, and our companion website for Frequently Asked Questions (the FAQ) before posting a question here.
The Google uk.d-i-y archive is available for searching at http://tinyurl.com/65kwq and the UK.D-I-Y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
The FAQ website gives background information about a diverse range of DIY topics, and guidance on formulating questions to post here that will most easily get the answers you need. For example, you should explain the background to the problem as well as asking your question.
The FAQ includes detailed information on common DIY problems in areas such as central heating, plumbing, electrical, decorating, security, plastering, and tools. It also has a reference section pointing to other useful sites and companies.
You should be aware that although replies in most cases are perfectly accurate and sensible, there are occasions when someone posts an inappropriate answer. In this case one of the regulars is very likely to post a correction, so it is always a good idea to check back later.
The FAQ makes clear that commercial advertising in the group is NOT welcome. Unsolicited advertising is considered abuse, and is likely to be reported as abuse to the advertiser's ISP. However, replies to specific questions which mention products sold by the person replying are acceptable. There is more information on commercial participation in the FAQ.
Phil The uk.d-i-y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk / The Google uk.d-i-y archive is at http://tinyurl.com/65kwq Remove NOSPAM from address to email me
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X-No-Archive [Weekly posting - Archived once a month]
This is an introduction to the UK.D-I-Y newsgroup for new and experienced Do-It-Yourselfers in the United Kingdom. If you want help, or just want to find out more about a problem before calling in 'the professionals' you are welcome to 'pick our brains'.
There is a good chance your query, or a very similar one, has already been discussed and answered by the group, so please have a look at the Google uk.d-i-y archive, and our companion website for Frequently Asked Questions (the FAQ) before posting a question here.
The Google uk.d-i-y archive is available for searching at http://tinyurl.com/65kwq and the UK.D-I-Y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
The FAQ website gives background information about a diverse range of DIY topics, and guidance on formulating questions to post here that will most easily get the answers you need. For example, you should explain the background to the problem as well as asking your question.
The FAQ includes detailed information on common DIY problems in areas such as central heating, plumbing, electrical, decorating, security, plastering, and tools. It also has a reference section pointing to other useful sites and companies.
You should be aware that although replies in most cases are perfectly accurate and sensible, there are occasions when someone posts an inappropriate answer. In this case one of the regulars is very likely to post a correction, so it is always a good idea to check back later.
The FAQ makes clear that commercial advertising in the group is NOT welcome. Unsolicited advertising is considered abuse, and is likely to be reported as abuse to the advertiser's ISP. However, replies to specific questions which mention products sold by the person replying are acceptable. There is more information on commercial participation in the FAQ.
Phil The uk.d-i-y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk / The Google uk.d-i-y archive is at http://tinyurl.com/65kwq Remove NOSPAM from address to email me
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HS> Spam
HS> > HS> X-No-Archive > [Weekly posting - Archived once a month] > HS> > This is an introduction to the UK.D-I-Y newsgroup for new
<snip>
HS> Spam
If it were, then only a moron would repost it by quoting the whole text!
Eric
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Phil Addison wrote:

Ta :-)
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1. Buy tool. 2. Discover it has no instructions. 3. Buy DIY book on heating. 4. Read instructions. 5. Rip up old bedcover to make bending pads. 6. Lightly oil spring. 7. Discover it won't go into the pipe you cut with your nice new pipe cutter, you have to use a hacksaw. 8. Insert in pipe. 9. Wipe up blood from cut caused by raw end of pipe using the flux rag. 10. Discover the flux really is acidic, scream a bit. 11. Bend as instructed. 12. Dislocate kneecap. 13. Push kneecap back in place. 14. Remember to bend a little too far and bend back a touch to ease tension on spring. 15. Insert tool to rotate spring to remove it. 16. Pull on spring. 17. Knock over cup of tea, stand in flux tin. 18. Swear several times. 19. Tell (without moving teeth apart) wife/partner/neighbour/children you know what you are doing. 20. Smash knuckles on wall as hand slips from pulling device. 21. Bang pipe on floor several times. 22. Saw off bent bit of pipe. Use vice, angle grinder, several mole grips and welding torch to recover pipe bender. 23. Repeat steps 6 to 22 until the pain and loss of blood gets too much or you run out of pipe. 24. Throw away now mangled pipe spring (or use as garden gate closer). 25. Buy a proper bending tool.
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Peter Parry.
http://www.wppltd.demon.co.uk
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Vodkajelly wrote:

email me and i will forward some bumf on how to calculate bends, imho tho most plumbers guess at the angle/ length, make the length longer and cut off excess. it's all in the experience. what are you doing? can you not use conventional endfeed/yorkshire fittings to achieve same result?
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